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Prasad Thenkabail

Research Geographer

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Short Biography

Dr. Prasad S. Thenkabail is a Research Geographer-15 with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), USA. He has 27+ years experience working as a well-recognized international expert in remote sensing and geographic information systems (RS/GIS) and their application to agriculture, wetlands, natural resource management, water resources, forests, sustainable development, and environmental studies. His work experience spans over 25+ countries spread across West and Central Africa (Rep. of Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, and Togo), southern Africa (Mozambique, South Africa), South Asia (Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Sri Lanka), Southeast Asia (Cambodia), the Middle East (Israel, Syria), East Asia (China), Central Asia (Uzbekistan), North America (the United States), South America (Brazil), and Pacific (Japan).

 

Prasad has conducted pioneering scientific research work in two major areas:

1.     Hyperspectral remote sensing of vegetation (http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439845370);

2.     Global irrigated area mapping (GIAM), and global mapping of rainfed cropland areas (GMRCA)(https://powellcenter.usgs.gov/globalcroplandwater/  ; http://www.iwmigiam.org).

He has published two seminal books in these areas of expertise:

3.     Hyperspectral remote sensing of vegetation (Taylor and Francis)

Reviews of this book:

http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439845370

4.     Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security (Taylor and Francis):

Reviews of this book:

http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781420090093

http://gfmt.blogspot.com/2011/05/review-remote-sensing-of-global.html

 

Current Scientificintellectual leadership provided by Prasad @ USGS include:

1.     Hyperspectral remote sensing of vegetation and agricultural crops (USGS GAM and LRS funded; NASA HyspIRI funded).

2.     Global croplands and their water use for food security in the twenty-first century:

(e.g., http://powellcenter.usgs.gov/current_projects.php#GlobalCroplandMembers) (USGS Powell Center Funded).

3.     Automated Cropland Classification Algorithm (ACCA): (e.g., http://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/folder/4f79f1b7e4b0009bd827f548) within WaterSMART (Sustain and Manage America’s Resources for Tomorrow) Project.

4.     Water productivity mapping in the irrigated croplands of California using multi-sensor remote sensing (USGS Mendenhall funded).

5.     Water for the World Project of IEEE (IEEE Funded).

6.     Committee for Earth Observation Systems (CEOS) Agriculture Societal Beneficial Area (SBA). (USGS nominated).

7.     Adjunct Professor (2010-present), Department of Soil, Water, and Environmental Science (SWES), University of Arizona (USA). 

 

The USGS and NASA selected Prasad to be on the Landsat Science Team (2007-2011) for a period of 5-years (http://landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/news/news-archive/pol_0005.html; http://ldcm.usgs.gov/intro.php).  Currently, he is the Editor-in-Chief of Remote Sensing Open Access Journal (http://www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing/editors/) and is on the editorial board of Remote Sensing of Environment and Journal Remote Sensing. In June 2007, Prasad’s team was recognized by the Environmental System Research Institute (ESRI) for “special achievement in GIS” (SAG award) for their Tsunami related work (tsdc.iwmi.org) and for their innovative spatial data portals (http://waterdata.iwmi.org/dtViewCommon.php; earlier http://www.iwmidsp.org). In 2008, Prasad and co-authors were the Second Place Recipients of the 2008 John I. Davidson ASPRS President’s Award for practical papers. He won the 1994 Autometric Award of the American Society of Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing (ASPRS). He was on a 3 member scientific advisory board of the Rapideye (a German Satellite Company) helping them design best wavebands for studying agriculture.

 

Prasad lead the remote sensing programs of following leading Institutes:

A.    International Water Management Institute (IWMI), 2003-2008;

B.    International Center for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), 1995-1997; 

C.    International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), 1992-1995;

 

He also worked as a key remote sensing scientist in the following Organizations:

D.    Yale Center for Earth Observation (YCEO), 1997-2003;

E.     Ohio State University (OSU), 1988-1992;

F.     National Remote Sensing Agency (NRSA), 1986-1988.

 

Dr. Thenkabail obtained Ph.D. from the Ohio State University (1992). His Master’s degree in Hydraulics and Water Resources Engineering (1984), and Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering (1981) were from India. He began his professional career as a lecturer in hydrology, water resources, hydraulics, and open channel on India. He has 100+ publications, mostly peer-reviewed research papers in major International remote sensing journals.

 

 



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13.0 Publications:  Total: 3 books, ~94 papers.

 

Books:

Thenkabail, P.S., Lyon, G.J., and Huete, A. 2011. Book entitled: “Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation”. CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York.  Pp. 781 (80+ pages in color).

Reviews of this book: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439845370

 

Thenkabail. P., Lyon, G.J., Turral, H., and Biradar, C.M. 2009. Book entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security” (CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York.  Pp. 556 (48 pages in color). Published in June, 2009.

Reviews of this book:

http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781420090093

http://gfmt.blogspot.com/2011/05/review-remote-sensing-of-global.html

 

Murali Krishna Gumma and Prasad S.Thenkabail. 2011. Methods and Approaches of irrigated area mapping using Remote Sensing. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing GmbH & Co. KG Dudweiler Landstr. 99, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. Schaltungsdienst Lange o.H.G., Berlin Books on Demand GmbH, Norderstedt Reha GmbH, Saarbrücken Amazon Distribution GmbH, Leipzig. ISBN: 978-3-8443-1099-3, paperback, 156 pages.

 

Peer-reviewed papers, Book chapters, Web Portals

Thenkabail, P.S. 2012. Principal Investigator. USGS Global croplands, their water use & food security Web\Data Portal, (https://powellcenter.usgs.gov/globalcroplandwater/)

 

Thenkabail, P.S., 2012. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites has released the 2012 The Earth Observation Handbook, Special Edition for the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, June 20-22, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  USGS research geographer Prasad Thenkabail was the lead contributor for the Global Food Security Case Study:

http://www.eohandbook.com/eohb2012/case_studies_global_food_security.html    

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Gumma, M.K., 2012. Selection of hyperspectral narrowbands (HNBs) and composition of hyperspectral two-band vegetation indices (HVIs) for biophysical characterization and discrimination of crop types using field reflectance and Hyperion/EO-1 data. . IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote
Sensing” (JSTARS). Accepted in June 2012.

 

Mariotto, I.,  Thenkabail, P.S., Huete, H., Slonecker, T., Platonov, A., 2012. Hyperspectral versus Multispectral Crop- Biophysical Modeling and Type Discrimination for the HyspIRI Mission. Remote Sensing of Environment. In review.

 

Thenkabail. P.S. Wu, Z., Verdin, J., and Rowland, J. 2012. An automated cropland classification algorithm (ACCA) using Fusion of Landsat, MODIS, secondary, and in-situ data. Remote Sensing Open Access Journal. In Review.

 

Thenkabail P.S., Knox J.W., Ozdogan, M., Gumma, M.K., Congalton, R.G., Wu, Z., Milesi, C., Finkral, A., Marshall, M., Mariotto, I., You, S. Giri, C. and Nagler, P. 2012.  Assessing future risks to agricultural productivity, water resources and food security: how can remote sensing help?. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing, August 2012 Special Issue on Global Croplands: Highlight Article. Accepted. In press.

 

Nagler, P., Thenkabail, P.S., Mileso, C., Giri, C., Ozdogan, M., Knox, J., You, S., Congalton, R.G., Finkral, A., Nagler, P., Mariotto, I., Marshall, M., Wu, Z. 2012. Working Group on Global Croplands and Water Use for Food Security in the Twenty-first Century. Factsheet. U.S. Geological Survey.

 

Thenkabail, P.S.,  Hanjra, M.A., Dheeravath, V., Gumma, M. 2011. Book Chapter #  16:  Global Croplands and Their Water Use Remote Sensing and Non-Remote Sensing Perspectives. In the Book entitled: “Advances in Environmental Remote Sensing: Sensors, Algorithms, and Applications”. Taylor and Francis Edited by Dr. Qihao Weng. Pp. 383-419.

Thenkabail, P.S., Lyon, G.J., and Huete, A. 2011. Book Chapter # 28: Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation and Agricultural Crops: Current Status and Future Possibilities. In  Book entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security” (CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York. Edited by Thenkabail, P.S., Lyon, G.J., and Huete, A. To be published in June, 2009. Pp. 50 (approx.)

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Lyon, G.J., and Huete, A. 2011. Book Chapter # 1: Advances in Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation. In  Book entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security” (CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York. Edited by Thenkabail, P.S., Lyon, G.J., and Huete, A. To be published in June, 2009. Pp. 60 (approx.)

 

Murali Krishna Gumma, Andrew Nelson, Prasad S. Thenkabail and Amrendra N. Singh, "Mapping rice areas of South Asia using MODIS multitemporal data", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 5, 053547 (Sep 01, 2011); doi:10.1117/1.3619838.

 

Gumma, M.K., Thenkabail, P.S., Muralikrishna, I.V., Velpuri, M.N., Gangadhararao, P.T., Dheeravath, V., Biradar, C.M., Acharya Nalan, S., Gaur, A., 2011. Changes in agricultural cropland areas between a water-surplus year and a water-deficit year impacting food security, determined using MODIS 250 m time-series data and spectral matching techniques, in the Krishna River basin (India). International Journal of Remote Sensing 32(12), 3495-3520.

 

Gumma, M.K.; Thenkabail, P.S.; Hideto, F.; Nelson, A.; Dheeravath, V.; Busia, D.; Rala, A. Mapping Irrigated Areas of Ghana Using Fusion of 30 m and 250 m Resolution Remote-Sensing Data. Remote Sens. 2011, 3, 816-835.

 

Gumma, M.K., Thenkabail, P.S., and nelson, A. 2011. Mapping Irrigated Areas Using MODIS 250 Meter Time-Series Data: A Study on Krishna River Basin (India). Water 2011, 3(1), 113-131; doi:10.3390/w3010113. www.mdpi.com/journal/water.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. 2010. Guest Editor: Special issue on “Global Croplands” for Journal Remote Sensing. Total: 22 papers. http://www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing/special_issues/croplands/.  

 

Thenkabail, P. S.. 2010. Editorial. "Global Croplands and their Importance for Water and Food Security in the Twenty-first Century: Towards an Ever Green Revolution that Combines a Second Green Revolution with a Blue Revolution." Remote Sens. 2, no. 9: 2305-2312.

 

Vision Document: Wiener, T., and Thenkabail, P.S. (editors). 2010. A Blueprint for the Water for the World: Pathway to a Blue Revolution. IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA. Pp. 45. Please access the document at:http://www.ieee-earth.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/final-A-Blueprint-for-Water-For-the-World-November-2010.pdf

 

Thenkabail P.S., Hanjra M.A., Dheeravath V., Gumma M. A. 2010.  A Holistic View of Global Croplands and Their Water Use for Ensuring Global Food Security in the 21st Century through Advanced Remote Sensing and Non-remote Sensing Approaches. Remote Sensing open access journal. 2(1):211-261. doi:10.3390/rs2010211.  http://www.mdpi.com/2072-4292/2/1/211.

 

Gumma, M., Nelson, A., Thenkabail, P.S., Singh, A.N., Garcia, C., Maunahan, A., Villano, L. 2010. Mapping rice areas in South Asia. Rice Today. July-September, 2010. Pp. 42-43.

 

Dheeravath, V., Thenkabail, P.S., Chandrakantha, G, Noojipady, P., Biradar, C.B., Turral. H., Gumma, M.1, Reddy, G.P.O., Velpuri, M. 2010. Irrigated areas of India derived using MODIS 500m data for years 2001-2003. ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.isprsjprs.2009.08.004. 65(1): 42-59.

 

Fujii, H., Gumma, M., Thenkabail, P., Namara, R. 2010 (August). Suitability Evaluation for Lowland Rice in Inland Valleys in West Africa. Journal Transactions of the Japanese society of Irrigation, drainage and rural Engineering. page numbers:Vol.78 No.4 pp47-55. publisher: Japanese society of Irrigation, drainage and rural Engineering. (In Japanese with abstract in English).

 

Milesi C., Samanta A., Hashimoto H., Kumar K.K., Ganguly S., Thenkabail P.S., Srivastava A.N., Nemani R.R., Myneni R.B. Decadal Variations in NDVI and Food Production in India. Remote Sensing. 2010; 2(3):758-776.

 

Gumma, M.K, Thenkabail, P.S., Bubacar, B. 2010. Delineating shallow ground water irrigated areas in the Atankwidi watershed (Northern Ghana, Burkina Faso) using Quickbird 0.61 - 2.44 meter Data. African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology Vol. 4 (6), pp. xxx-xxx, June, 2010. Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJEST. ISSN 1991-637X © 2010 Academic Journals.

 

Cai, X. Thenkabail, P. 2010. Using remote sensing to assess crop water productivity. SPIE Newsroom. DOI: 10.1117/2.1201002.002576. http://spie.org/x39199.xml?highlight=x2420&ArticleID=x39199.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar C.M., Noojipady, P., Dheeravath, V., Li, Y.J., Velpuri, M., Gumma, M., Reddy, G.P.O., Turral, H., Cai, X. L., Vithanage, J., Schull, M., and Dutta, R. 2009. Global irrigated area map (GIAM), derived from remote sensing, for the end of the last millennium. International Journal of Remote Sensing. 30(14): 3679-3733. July, 20, 2009.

 

Velpuri, M., Thenkabail, P.S., Gumma, M.K., Biradar, C.B., Dheeravath, V., Noojipady, P., Yuanjie, L., 2009. Influence of Resolution or Scale in Irrigated Area Mapping and Area Estimations. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing (PE&RS). 75(12): December 2009 issue.

 

Biradar, C.M., Thenkabail, P.S., Noojipady, P., Yuanjie, L., Dheeravath, V., Velpuri, M., Turral, H., Gumma, M.K., Reddy, O.G.P., Xueliang, L. C., Schull, M.A., Alankara, R.D., Gunasinghe, S., Mohideen, S., Xiao, X. 2009. A global map of rainfed cropland areas (GMRCA) at the end of last millennium using remote sensing. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation.  11(2). 114-129. doi:10.1016/j.jag.2008.11.002. January, 2009.

 

Cai, X.L., Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C., Platonov, A., Gumma, M., Dheeravath, V., Cohen, Y., Goldshlager, N., Eyal Ben-Dor, Victor Alchanatis, and Vithanage, J.V. 2008. Water Productivity Mapping Methods and Protocols using Remote Sensing Data of Various Resolutions to Support “more crop per drop”. Journal of Applied Remote Sensing. 3(1) 033557 (2009); doi:10.1117/1.3257643. Published October 12, 2009.

 

Chavula, G., Brezonik, P., Thenkabail, P., Johnson, T., Bauer, M., 2009. Estimating chlorophyll concentration in Lake Malawi from MODIS satellite imagery, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth.  Parts A/B/C. 34(13-16): 755-760. doi: 10.1016/j.pce.2009.07.015.

 

Chavula, G., Brezonik, P., Thenkabail, P., Johnson, T., Bauer, M., 2009. Estimating the surface temperature of Lake Malawi using AVHRR and MODIS satellite imagery, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth.  Parts A/B/C. 34(13-16): 749-754.  doi: 10.1016/j.pce.2009.08.001.

 

Thenkabail. P.S., Biradar, C.M., Noojipady, P., Dheeravath, V., Gumma, M., Li, Y.J., Velpuri, M., Gangalakunta, O.R.P. 2009. Book Chapter 3: Global irrigated area maps (GIAM) and statistics using remote sensing. Pp. 41-120. In the book entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security” (CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York.  Pp. 475. Published in June, 2009. (Editors: Thenkabail. P., Lyon, G.J., Biradar, C.M., and Turral, H.).

 

Turral, H., Thenkabail, P.S., Lyon, J.G., and Biradar, C.M. 2009. Book Chapter 1: Context, need: The need and scope for mapping global irrigated and rain-fed areas. Pp. 3-12. In the book entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security” (CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York.  Pp. 475. Published in June, 2009. (Editors: Thenkabail. P., Lyon, G.J., Biradar, C.M., and Turral, H.).

 

Li, Y.J., Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C.M., Noojipady, P., Dheeravath, V., Velpuri, M., Gangalakunta, O.R., Cai, X.L. 2009. Book Chapter 2: A history of irrigated areas of the world. Pp. 13-40. In the book entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security” (CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York.  Pp. 475. Published in June, 2009. (Editors: Thenkabail. P., Lyon, G.J., Biradar, C.M., and Turral, H.).

 

Gangalakunta, O.R.P., Dheeravath, V., Thenkabail, P.S., Chandrakantha, G., Biradar, C.M., Noojipady, P., Velpuri, M., and Kumar, M.A. 2009. Book Chapter 5: Irrigated areas of India derived from satellite sensors and national statistics: A way forward from GIAM experience. Pp. 139-176. In the book entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security” (CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York.  Pp. 475. Published in June, 2009. (Editors: Thenkabail. P., Lyon, G.J., Biradar, C.M., and Turral, H.).

 

Biradar, C.M., Thenkabail. P.S., Noojipady, P., Li, Y.J., Dheeravath, V., Velpuri, M., Turral, H., Cai, X.L., Gumma, M., Gangalakunta, O.R.P., Schull, M., Alankara, R.D., Gunasinghe, S., and Xiao, X. 2009. Book Chapter 15: Global map of rainfed cropland areas (GMRCA) and stastistics using remote sensing. Pp. 357-392. In the book entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security” (CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York.  Pp. 475. Published in June, 2009. (Editors: Thenkabail. P., Lyon, G.J., Biradar, C.M., and Turral, H.).

 

Thenkabail, P.S. and Lyon, J.G. 2009. Book Chapter 20: Remote sensing of global croplands for food security: way forward. Pp. 461-466. In the book entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security” (CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York.  Pp. 475. Published in June, 2009. (Editors: Thenkabail. P., Lyon, G.J., Biradar, C.M., and Turral, H.).

 

Thenkabail, P. S.; Dheeravath, V.; Biradar, C. M.; Gangalakunta, O. P.; Noojipady, P.; Gurappa, C.; Velpuri, M.; Gumma, M.; Li, Y. 2009. Irrigated Area Maps and Statistics of India Using Remote Sensing and National Statistics. Journal Remote Sensing. 1:50-67. http://www.mdpi.com/2072-4292/1/2/50.

 

Gumma, M.K., Thenkabail, P.S., Fujii, H., and Namara, R., 2009. Spatial models for selecting the most suitable areas of rice cultivation in the Inland Valley Wetlands of Ghana using remote sensing and geographic information systems. J. Appl. Remote Sens. Vol. 3, 033537.

 

Platonov, A., Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C., Cai, X., Gumma, M., Dheeravath, V., Cohen, Y., Alchanatis, V., Goldshlager, N., Ben-Dor, E., Vithanage, J., Manthrithilake, H., Kendjabaev, Sh., and Isaev. S. 2008. Water Productivity Mapping (WPM) using Landsat ETM+ Data for the Irrigated Croplands of the Syrdarya River Basin in Central Asia. Sensors Journal, 8(12), 8156-8180; DOI:  10.3390/s8128156. http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/8/12/8156/pdf.

 

Biradar, C.M., Thenkabail, P.S., Platonov, A., Xiangming, X., Geerken, R., Vithanage, J., Turral, H., and Noojipady, P. 2008. Water Productivity Mapping Methods using Remote Sensing. Journal of Applied Remote Sensing, Vol. 2, 023544 (6 November 2008).

 

Islam, Md. A., Thenkabail, P. S., Kulawardhana, R. W., Alankara, R., Gunasinghe, S., Edussriya, C. and Gunawardana, A. 2008. 'Semi-automated methods for mapping wetlands using Landsat ETM+ and SRTM data',International Journal of Remote Sensing,. 29:24,7077 — 7106.

 

Curtis E Woodcock, Richard Allen, Martha Anderson, Alan Belward, Robert Bindschadler, Warren Cohen, Feng Gao, Samuel N Goward, Dennis Helder, Eileen Helmer, Rama Nemani, Lazaros Oreopoulos, Joh Schott, Prasad S. Thenkabail, Eric F Vermote, James Vogelmann, Michael A Wulder, Randolph Wynne.  Free access to Landsat Imagery. Science. 2008 May 23;320 (5879):1011 18497274.

 

Gumma, M.K., Thenkabail, P.S., and Velpuri, N.M., 2009. Vegetation phenology to partition groundwater from surface water-irrigated areas using MODIS 250-m time series data for the Krishna River basin, India. Improving Integrated Surface and Ground-water Resources Management in a Vulnerable and Changing World (Proc. of JS.3 at the Joint IAHS & IAH Convention, Hyderabad, India, September 2009). IAHS Publ. 330, 2009. Copyright © 2009 IAHS Press 271.

 

Gumma, Murali Krishna [IWMI]; Thenkabail, Prasad S. [IWMI]; Gautam, N. C. NARS]; Gangadhara Rao, T. Parthasaradhi [IWMI]; Manohar, Velpuri [IWMI]  2008. rrigated area mapping using AVHRR, MODIS and LANDSAT ETM+ data for the Krishna River basin, India. Technology Spectrum, 2(1):1-11.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., GangadharaRao, P., Biggs, T., Krishna, M., and Turral, H., 2007. Spectral Matching Techniques to Determine Historical Land use/Land cover (LULC) and Irrigated Areas using Time-series AVHRR Pathfinder Datasets in the Krishna River Basin, India. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing. 73(9): 1029-1040. (Second Place Recipients of the 2008 John I. Davidson ASPRS President’s Award for Practical papers).

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar C.M., Noojipady, P., Cai, X.L., Dheeravath, V., Li, Y.J., Velpuri, M., Gumma, M., Pandey., S. 2007. Sub-pixel irrigated area calculation methods. Sensors Journal (special issue: Remote Sensing of Natural Resources and the Environment (Remote Sensing Sensors Edited by Assefa M. Melesse). 7:2519-2538.  http://www.mdpi.org/sensors/papers/s7112519.pdf.

 

Biradar, C.M., Thenkabail. P.S., Islam, Md. A., Anputhas, M., , Tharme, R.,Vithanage. J.,  Aankara, R., and Gunasinghe, S. 2007. Establishing best spectral bands and timing of Imagery for land use / land cover (LULC) class separability using Landsat ETM+ and Terra MODIS data. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing (CJRS). 33(5). 431-444.

 

Kulawardhana, R. W., Thenkabail, P. S., Vithanage, J., Biradar, C., Islam, Md. A., Gunasinghe, S., Alankara, R. 2007. Evaluation of the Wetland Mapping Methods using Landsat ETM+ and SRTM Data. Journal of Spatial Hydrology (JoSH). 7(2): 62-96. ISSN: 1530-4736.

 

Biggs, T.W., Gaur, A., Scott, C.A., Thenkabail, P., Gangadhara Rao, R., Krishna Gumma, M., Acharya, S.K., Turral, H. 2007. Closing of the Krishna Basin: Irrigation, Streamflow Depletion and Macroscale Hydrology. International Water Management Institute, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Research Report 111.

 

Melesse, A.M., Weng, Q., Thenkabail, P., and Senay, G. 2007. Remote Sensing Sensors and Applications in Environmental Resources Mapping and Modelling. Special Issue of Remote Sensing of Natural Resources and the Environment. Sensors Journal. 7:3209-3241. http://www.mdpi.org/sensors/papers/s7123209.pdf.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C.M., Turral, H., Noojipady, P., Li, Y.J., Vithanage, J., Dheeravath, V., Velpuri, M., Schull M., Cai, X. L., , Dutta, R. 2006. An Irrigated Area Map of the World (1999) derived from  Remote Sensing. Research Report # 105. International Water Management Institute. Pp. 74. Also, see under documents in: http://www.iwmigiam.org.

 

Biggs, T., Thenkabail, P.S., Krishna, M., GangadharaRao, P., and Turral, H., 2006. Vegetation phenology and irrigated area mapping using combined MODIS time-series, ground surveys, and agricultural census data in Krishna River Basin, India. International Journal of Remote Sensing. 27(19):4245-4266.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Schull, M., Turral, H. 2005. Ganges and Indus River Basin Land Use/Land Cover (LULC) and Irrigated Area Mapping using Continuous Streams of MODIS Data. Remote Sensing of Environment. Remote Sensing of Environment, 95(3): 317-341.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Gamage, N., and Smakhin, V. 2004. The use of remote sensing data for drought assessment and monitoring in south west Asia. IWMI Research report # 85. Pp. 25. IWMI, Colombo, Sri Lanka.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Stucky, N.,  Griscom, B.W., Ashton, M.S., Diels, J., Van Der Meer, B., and Enclona, E. 2004. Biomass estimations and carbon Stock calculations in the oil palm plantations of African derived savannas using IKONOS data, International Journal of Remote Sensing. International Journal of Remote Sensing. 25(23):5447-5472.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Enclona, E.A., Ashton, M.S., Legg, C., Jean De Dieu, M., 2004. Hyperion, IKONOS, ALI, and ETM+ sensors in the study of African rainforests. Remote Sensing of  Environment, 90:23-43.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Enclona, E.A., Ashton, M.S., and Van Der Meer, V. 2004. Accuracy Assessments of Hyperspectral Waveband Performance for Vegetation Analysis Applications. Remote Sensing of  Environment, 91:2-3: 354-376.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., 2004. Inter-sensor relationships between IKONOS and Landsat-7 ETM+ NDVI data in three ecoregions of Africa. INT. J. REMOTE SENSING, 25 (2): 389-408.

 

Enclona, E.A., Thenkabail, P.S., Celis, D., Diekmann, J. 2004. Within-field wheat yield prediction from IKONOS Data:A New Matrix Approach. International Journal of Remote Sensing. 25(2): 377-388.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Hall, J., Lin, T., Ashton, M.S., Harris, D., Enclona, E.A. 2003. Detecting floristic structure and pattern across topographic and moisture gradients in a mixed species Central African forest using IKONOS and Landsat-7 ETM+ images. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation. 4: 255–270.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. 2003. Biophysical and yield information for precision farming from near-real time and historical Landsat TM images. International Journal of Remote Sensing. 24(14): 2879-2904.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. 2003.    The use of remote sensing for the characterization of large river basins: Issues pertaining to challenge program benchmark basins. Working Paper CD. Produced for CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food. www.waterforfood.org. International Water Mangement Institute (IWMI), P.O. Box 2075, Battaramulla, Colombo, Sri Lanka.

 

Thenkabail P.S., Smith, R.B., and De-Pauw, E. 2002. Evaluation of Narrowband and Broadband Vegetation Indices for Determining Optimal Hyperspectral Wavebands for Agricultural Crop Characterization. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing. 68(6): 607-621.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., 2002. Optimal Hyperspectral Narrowbands for Discriminating Agricultural Crops. Remote Sensing Reviews. 20(4): 257-291.

 

Thenkabail, P. S. and Ashton, M. S.  2001.  Characterization of Humid-Forest and Savanna Ecoregions of West and Central Africa Using Satellite Sensor Data of Three Eras.  3rd International Conference on Geospatial Information in Agriculture and Forestry, November 5-7, 2001, Denver, CO. Proceedings paper #1-4 . Page 1-8.

 

Christian Nolte, Jean Kotto-Same, Appolinaire Moukam, Prasad S. Thenkabail, Stephan F. Weise, Paul L. Woomer and Louis Zapfack.2001. Land-Use Characterization and Estimation of Carbon Stocks in the Alternatives to Slash-and-Burn Benchmark Area in Cameroon. Resource and Crop Management Division (RCMD) Monograph No. 28, RCMD, IITA, Ibadan, Nigeria. 27pp.

 

Thenkabail P.S., Nolte, C., and Lyon, J.G. 2000a. Remote sensing and GIS modeling for selection of benchmark research area in the inland valley agroecosystems of West and Central Africa. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing, Africa Applications Special Issue, 66(6):755-768.

 

Thenkabail P.S., Smith, R.B., and De-Pauw, E. 2000b. Hyperspectral vegetation indices for determining agricultural crop characteristics. Remote sensing of Environment. 71:158-182.

 

Thenkabail S. Prasad, and Nolte, C. 2000. Regional characterisation of inland valley agroecosystems in West and central Africa using high-resolution remotely sensed data. (Book Chapter # 8 Pp. 77-99). in the book entitled: "GIS applications for water resources and watershed management" by John G. Lyon, Pp. 266. Taylor and Francis, London and New York.

 

Thenkabail S. Prasad 1999.   Characterisation of the Alternative to slash-and-burn benchmark research area representing the Congolese rainforests of Africa using near-real-time SPOT HRV data.  The International Journal of Remote Sensing. 20(5):839-877.

 

Thenkabail P.S., Smith, R.B., and De-Pauw, E. 1999. Hyperspectral vegetation indices for determining agricultural crop characteristics. CEO research publication series No. 1, Center for earth Observation, Yale University. Pp. 47. Book:ISBN:0-9671303-0-1. (Yale University, New Haven).

 

Kouchoukos, N., Smith, R., Gleason, A., Thenkabail, P., Hole, F., Barkoudah, Y., Albert, J., Gluhoshky, P., Foster, J. 1998. Monitoring the distribution, use, and regeneration of natural resources in semi-arid Southwest Asia, Yale Forestry and Environmental Sciences Bulletin, School of Forestry, Yale University, pp. 1-24.

 

Thenkabail P.S., Smith, R.B., and De-Pauw, E. 1998. Crop growth and yield studies using a 512-band spectrometer in the semi-arid environments of Syria, Proceedings of the  First International Conference on Geospatial Information in Agriculture and Forestry: Decision support, technology and applications. ERIM International Inc., AnnArbor, Michigan. II:587-594.

 

Thenkabail S. Prasad,  and Nolte, C.  1996.   Capabilities of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data in regional mapping and characterization of inland valley agroecosystems in West Africa. The International Journal of Remote Sensing. 17(8):1505-1538.

 

Thenkabail, Prasad S., and C. Nolte. 1995a.  Mapping and Characterising Inland Valley Agroeco­systems of West and Central Africa: A Methodology Integrating Remote Sensing, Global Positioning System, and Ground-Truth Data in a Geographic Information Systems Frame­work.  RCMD Monograph No.16, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria.  62 pp.

 

Thenkabail, Prasad S., and C. Nolte. 1995b.  Regional characterisation of inland valley agroeco­systems in Save, Bante, Bassila, and Parakou regions in south-central Republic of Benin through integration of remote sensing, global positioning system, and ground-truth data in a geographic information systems framework.  Inland Valley Characterisation Report No.1.  Resource and Crop Management Division, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria. 60 pp.

 

Thenkabail, Prasad S., and C. Nolte 1995c.  Regional characterisation of inland valley agroecosystems in Gagnoa, Côte d'Ivoire through integration of remote sensing, global positioning systems, and ground-truth data in a geographic information systems framework.  Inland Valley Characterisation Report No.2.  Resource and Crop Management Division, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria. 52 pp.

 

Thenkabail, Prasad S., and C. Nolte 1995d.  Regional Characterisation of Inland Valley Agroecosystems in Sikasso, Mali and Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso through integration of Remote Sensing, Global Positioning Systems and Ground-Truth Data in a Geographic Information Systems Framework.  Inland Valley Characterisation Report No.3.  Resource and Crop Management Division, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria. 46 pp.

 

Thenkabail Prasad S., 1995e.  Benchmark Research Area in the Forest Margin, Cameroon. Normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) poster. Resource and Crop Management Division, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria.

 

Thenkabail Prasad S., and Nolte, C. 1995f.  Zooming in on backyard resources.  Satellite imagery pinpoints the potential of inland valleys.  In the Annual report of International Institute of Tropical Agriculture 1994.

 

Thenkabail Prasad S. 1995g.  The need, use, and importance of remote sensing and digital databases to the Forestry and Agroforestry related research activities of the International Agriculture.  Paper prepared for the consultative group of international agricultural research (CGIAR) workshop on application of remote sensing and GIS databases to the Forestry and Agroforestry related research activities of the CGIAR.  March 14-17, 1995,  CGIAR headquarters (the world bank), Washington DC, USA.

 

Thenkabail S. Prasad,  Ward A.D., and  Lyon J.G.  1995h. Impacts of agricultural management practices on soybean and corn crops evident in ground-truth data and thematic Mapper vegetation indices. Transactions of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers. 37(3):989-995.

 

Thenkabail S. Prasad,  Ward A.D., and  Lyon J.G.  1994a.   LANDSAT-5 Thematic Mapper models of soybean and corn  crop characteristics. The International Journal of Remote Sensing. 15(1):49-61.

 

Thenkabail S. Prasad,  Ward A.D.,  Lyon J.G.,  and  Merry C.J.  1994b.  Thematic Mapper vegetation indices for determining soybean and corn crop growth parameters. The Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing. 60(4):437-442.

 

Thenkabail S. Prasad,  Ward A.D.,  Lyon J.G., and  Van Deventer Peter. 1992a. LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) indices for evaluating management and growth characteristics of soybeans and corn. Transactions of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers(ASAE). 35(5) : 1441-1448.

 

Thenkabail S. Prasad  1992b.   Capabilities of LANDSAT-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data in studying soybean and corn crop variables. Ph.D. Dissertation. The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA. pp.371.

Van Deventer Peter, Ruebens Anglio, Ward A.D., Lyon J.G., and Thenkabail S. Prasad  1991.   Soil mapping using LANDSAT Thematic Mapper data.  Presented as ASAE paper No. 91-7046.

 

Prasad T.S.,  and  Thiruvengadachari S.  1987a.  Drought prediction :  A review.  Report No. : RSAM - NRSA -DRM - TR - 03/87, Drought Mission Team, Department of Space, Govt. of India. pp. 84.

 

Thiruvengadachari S., and  Prasad T.S.  1987b.  Satellite monitoring of agricultural droughts in the Tadpatri Taluk of Ananthpur District in Andhra Pradesh. Report No. : RSAM-NRSA-DRM-TR-06/87; Drought Mission Team, Department of Space, Govt. of India. pp. 52.

 

Thiruvengadachari S.,  and  Prasad T.S.,  1987c.  Aridity anomaly as drought indicator : an evaluation, Report No. : RSAM - NRSA - DRM - TR - 09/87,Drought Mission Team , Department of Space, Govt. of India. pp. 48.

 

Thiruvengadachari S.,  Jayasheelan A.T.,  and  Prasad T.S. 1987d.  Satellite monitoring of seasonal vegetation dynamics. Report No. : RSAM - NRSA - DRM - TR - 05/87; Drought Mission Team , Department of Space, Govt. of India. pp. 31.

 

Thiruvengadachari S.,  Prasad T.S., and  Harikishan J.  1987e. Satellite monitoring of agricultural drought in Anantapur District in Andhra Pradesh State, Report No. : RSAM - NRSA - DRM - TR - 03/87, Drought Mission Team, Department of Space, Govt. of India. pp. 35.

 

James E.J., Shreedhan K.E., Ranganna G., Nayak I.V., and  Prasad T.S.  1986.  Design of rain-guage network using spatial correlation for the Bharathapuzha basin on the Malabar Coast of India,  Integrated Design of Hydrological Networks (Proceedings of the Budapest Symposium, July 1986), IAHS Publ. No. 158. pp. 49-55.

 

Prasad T. S.  1985. Hydrological studies in the western ghat region with reference to geomorphology, raingauge network design, and mathematical modelling.  M.E. Thesis.  Water resources engineering section.  Department of Applied Mechanics and Hydrulics, Karnataka Regional Engineering College, Surathkal, Karnataka, India. pp. 129.

 

14.0 Recent Conferences\workshops\invited lectures (2001-2012 sample)

Thenkabail, P.S., August 30, 2012, Menlo Park, California: Public Lecture. Global Food Security in the 21st Century: the increasing need for food production, cropland areas, and agricultural water . At the USGS Menlo Park Western Geographic Science Center Headquarters, Open to Public.

Thenkabail, P.S., July 10-11, 2012, Montreal, Canada: Participated. Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Global Agricultural Monitoring initiative (GEO-GLAM) Meeting.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. and Wu, Z., June 21, 2012, Flagstaff, AZ, USA: WaterSMART (Sustain and Manage America’s Resources for Tomorrow ) meeting. Presented:An Automated Cropland\Fallowland Classification Algorithm (ACCA) using Multi-sensor Remote Sensing”.

 

Wu, Z. and Thenkabail, P.S., June 21, 2012, Flagstaff, AZ, USA. WaterSMART (Sustain and Manage America’s Resources for Tomorrow ) meeting. DemonstratedAutomated Cropland\Fallowland Classification Algorithm (ACCA)”.

 

Marshall. M. and Thenkabail, P.S. June 21, 2012, Flagstaff, AZ, USA.  WaterSMART (Sustain and Manage America’s Resources for Tomorrow ) meeting. Advisor: “water productivity of irrigated croplands of California”.

 

Thenkabail, P.S.  March 5-8, 2012. NASA Terrestrial Ecology peer review panel:  “Panel:  New and Multisensor Approaches and Gulf of Mexico” to convene on.  Washington, DC, USA.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. December 6-8, 2011. Attended. Water Census / WaterSMART Organizational Meeting this week in Reston, USA.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. Pecora 18 conference, Herndon, VA.. 2011 November 13-18, 2011. Workshop on “Advanced Hyperspectral Sensing of the Terrestrial Environment”. Pecora 18, My Role: Main workshop organizer and presenter. Other workshop organizers were: Dr. Dean Riley of the Aerospace Corporation and Prof. John Lyon of US Bureau of Land Management.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Pecora 18 conference. Herndon, VA. November 13-18, 2011. Presented “An Automated Cropland Classification Algorithm (ACCA) using Advanced Remote Sensing Methods and Approaches”.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Pecora 18 conference. Herndon, VA. November 13-18, 2011. Presented “IEEE Water for the World Projects: A Contribution to GEO Water and Agricultural Societal Beneficial Area”.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Pecora 18 conference. Herndon, VA. November 13-18, 2011. Presented: “Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation: Knowledge Gain and Knowledge Gap After 40 years of Research”

 

Thenkabail P.S. October 29-Nov. 4. Presented: “Improving Water Productivity for Agriculture - Predicting and Preventing Crisis in Irrigated Water Use in a Changing Climate”. Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC), Seattle, WA.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. October, 2011. Improving Water Productivity for Agriculture - Predicting and Preventing Crisis in Irrigated Water Use in a Changing Climate. Global Humanitarian Technology Conference. October 30-November 1, 2011. Seattle, Washington State, USA.

 

Sharma, C., Thenkabail, P.S., Sharma, J.R.,October, 2011.  and Earth Observing Data and Methods for Advancing Water Harvesting Technologies in the Semi-arid Rain-fed Environemnts of India. Proceedings of the Global Humanitarian Technology Conference. October 30-November 1, 2011. Seattle, Washington State, USA.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. October 19-26, 20121. Limiting Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Water Use from Global Croplands and yet  Ensuring Global Food Security in the Twenty-first Century: Pathways and Strategies. Low Carbon Earth ummit, Dalian, China.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. Sept. 26-30, 2011. Working Group on Global Croplands (WGGC) Plan for the Week (Including Products Expected). USGS Powell Center Working Group on Global cropland and their water use for food security.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. Sept. 26-30, 2011. Global Croplands and their Water Use for Food Security in the 21st Century Advanced Remote Sensing and Non-remote Sensing Methods and Approaches.  USGS Powell Center Working Group on Global cropland and their water use for food security.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. Sept. 26-30, 2011. Water Productivity Modeling and Mapping to Facilitate Production of “more crop per drop” Leading to Blue Revolution. USGS Powell Center Working Group on Global cropland and their water use for food security.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. and Stryker, T. Sept., 2011. JECAM and the GEO-G20 Global Agricultural Monitoring Initiative . CEOS-SIT workshop, Washington, DC.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. , Sept., 2011. Global Croplands and their Water Use for Food Security in the 21st Century Advanced Remote Sensing and Non-remote Sensing Methods and Approaches. Lecture Lecture @ USGS  National Center @ Reston, VA. September 15, 2011  Lecture given to the Mid-America Consultants International (Team from Argentina and Brazil).  Reston USGS HQ.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. Sioux Falls, USA. August 16-18, 2011. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation:  Knowledge Gain and Knowledge Gap After 40 years of Research. Landsat Science Team Meeting.

 

Isabella Mariotto, Prasad S. Thenkabail, Alfredo Huete, E. Terrence Slonecker, Edward P. Glenn. and Alexander Platonov. August, 2011. Water Use and Water Productivity of Key World Agricultural Crops for Supporting Food Security Using Hyperspectral and Thermal Data. NASA Hyspri Workshop poster.

 

Prasad S. Thenkabail made a presentation entitled: “CEOS agricultural SBA perspectives” during the CEOS Joint Experiment for Crop Area Monitoring (JECAM), Space Data Coordination Meeting, Ottawa, Canada, June 21-22, 2011. Water S

 

Prasad S. Thenkabail, June 13, 2011.  made a presentation entitled: “Predicting and Preventing Crisis in Irrigated Water Use in a Changing Climate Measuring, Modeling and Mapping Trends and Changes in Agricultural Water Productivity for California. WaterSMART (Sustain and Manage  America’s Resources for Tomorrow) Project team presentation. 

 

Prasad S. Thenkabail made a presentation entitled: “CEOS space agency data coordination: global agricultural monitoring system of systems for Joint Experiment for Crop Area Monitoring (JECAM)” at the 26th CEOS Stratetic Initiative Team (SIT) meeting held in Frascati, Italy during 23-24,May, 2011.

 

Maryland, USA. May 17-18, 2011. (Invited lecture). HypIRI Symposium to be held in Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. Presented: “Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation:Knowledge gain and Knowledge gap after 40 years of research?".Knowledge Gain and Knowledge Gap after 40 years of research”.

 

Curitiba city, Paraná State, Southern Brazil, April 30-May 5, 2011 (Invited keynote speaker). Presented “Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation” at the XV Brazilian Remote Sensing Symposium (www.dsr.inpe.br/sbsr2011) to be held in Curitiba city, Paraná State, Southern Brazil, from April 30 to May 5, 2011.

 

New Delhi, India. March 22-23. US-India strategic dialogue on science workshop. Presented “Remote sensing of global croplands, their water use, and water productivity” at the US-India Water for Agriculture workshop. I was one of the 6 scientists representing USGS, USDA, and NASA.

 

Phoenix, AZ. March 1-3, 2011. A Knowledge-based Automated Cropland Mapping Algorithm using Advanced Remote Sensing Methods and Approaches. Landsat Science Meeting.

 

Haifa, Israel (February 21-24, 2011). AGRI-SENSING 2011: International Symposium on Sensing in Agriculture in Memory of Dahlia Greidinger (Invited Keynote Speaker).  The Symposium will take place from February 21-24, 2011, at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel. Gave a lecture on: “Advances in Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation and Agricultural crops”. Also, chaired a session on Precision Farming.

 

Washington, DC region (Arlington, Virginia) on February 16-17, 2011. CEOS-GEO Actions Workshop. Presented: “CEOS Space Agency Data for JECAM: Strategies and initiatives”.

 

Seattle, American Society of Geographers (AAG), April 12-16, 2011. Presented: “A Knowledge-based Algorithm for automated Agricultural Cropland Mapping Using Fusion of Landsat, MODIS, Secondary, and in-situ Data”

 

Tokyo, Japan. March 14 and 15, 2011. Integrated Global Water Cycle Observations (IGWCO) Community of Practice (COP) annual science and planning meeting at the University of Tokyo in Tokyo Japan on. Presented: “Agriculture and Water initiatives of IEEE Water for the World Project in contribution to GEO Water and GEO Agriculture”

 

Dalian, China. October 19-26, 2011. Low Carbon Earth Summit-2011 (LCES-2011), @ Dalian, China (Invited Special Session Host). My session is entitled:“Session: Track 4-1-2: Limiting Greenhouse Gases and Water Use from Global Croplands and Ensuring Global Food Security in the Twenty-first Century: Pathways and Strategies (Part Two) . Oct. 20, 2011 (Thursday)” with a theme of “Leading Green Economy, Returning to the Harmony Nature”, which will be held during October 19-26, 2011 at World Exposition Center, Dalian, China. 

 

Denver (Colorado). June 7-11, 2010. USGS 3rd Modeling Conference. Special Session:  Water Census and Ecosystems:  Remote Sensing Based Models of Water Availability and Water Use (ET) in the Dry Ecosystems of the Southwestern USA. (Special session by  Pamela Nagler and  Prasad Thenkabail).

 

San Diego, CA, USA. April 26-30, 2010. Ammerican Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) Annual Conference. Special Session on “Uncertainties, Errors, and Accuracies in the Study of Terrestrial Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) using Remote Sensing” (Special Session Hosted by: Prasad S. Thenkabail). Will give a lecture entitled: “Uncertainties, errors, and accuracies in land use\land cover and biomass ECVusing hyperspectral, hyperspatial, and advanced multispectral data”.

 

San Diego, CA, USA. April 26-30, 2010. Ammerican Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) Annual Conference. Special Session on “Global Croplands and Their Water use” (Special Session Hosted by: Prasad S. Thenkabail). Will give a lecture entitled: “A holistic View of Global Croplands and Their Water use: Remote Sensing and non-remote sensing approaches”.

 

San Diego, CA, USA. April 26-30, 2010. Ammerican Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) Annual Conference. Will give a lecture entitled: “Phenological Studies using Spectral Matching Techniques: Global to Local Scales”.

 

Washington, DC. April 15-18, 2010. Association of American Geographers (AAG). Special session on: “Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Applications at the U.S. Geological Survey” (Special Session co-hosted by Terrence Slonecker and Prasad Thenkabail). Will give a key talk entitled: “Advances in Hyperspectral Study of Agricultural Crops and Vegetation”.

 

Tokyo, Japan. April 13-14, 2010. CEOS Strategic Implementation Team (SIT) meeting.  

 

Sacramento, CA, USA. March 29-30, 2010. USGS Delta Science Workshop. Made a presentation entitled: “Predicting and Preventing Crisis in Irrigated Water Use in a Changing Climate Measuring, Modeling and Mapping Trends and Changes in Agricultural Water Productivity for California”.

 

Sao José dos Campos, Brazil. February 23-25, 2010. CEOS Land Surface Imaging Constellation Study Team. Working Meeting. Also, INPE (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais or National Institute for Space Research, Brazil)-USGS, USA bilateral meeting. Made a presentation entitled: “Global croplands and their water use”.

 

Washington, DC, USA. January 26-29, 2010. Committee of Earth Observation Systems (CEOS) Global Earth Observing (GEO) actions workshop as Coordinator of CEOS Agricultural Societal beneficial Area (SBA). Contributed to 2 new CEOS Agricultural tasks on Global Agricultural Monitoring Systems AG-07-03a: (a) AG-07-03_5 (global croplands and their water use assessments using multi-sensor remote sensing data fusion); and (b) AG-07-03_6 (global initiative on the water for the world for food security through spaceborne data).

 

SanJose, California, USA. January 19-21, 2010. Landsat Science Team meeting. Attended.

 

Ahmedabad, India. December 17-19, 2009. International Workshop on “Impact of Climate Change on Agriculture”. Represented USGS. Made a Invited presentation entitled: “Global croplands and their water use: remote sensing and non-remote sensing approaches”. Chaired a session.

 

Vancouver, Washington State, USA. November 3-4, 2009. Landsat Data Products Workshop. Landsat Science Meeting. Made a presentation entitled: “Satellite Sensor Data normalization issues: A user's perspective”.

 

Boston, MA, USA. October 27-29, 2009. Landsat Data Products Workshop. Landsat Science Meeting. Made a presentation entitled: “Satellite Sensor Data normalization issues: A user's perspective”.

 

Tucson, AZ. October 19, 2009. Invited Seminar Lecture EntitledA Holistic View of Global Croplands and their Water Use for Ensuring Global Food Security in the Twenty-first Century through Advance Remote Sensing and Non-remote Sensing Approaches”.

 

Sioux Falls, SD, USA. September 23, 2009. USGS Water Initiative/GIS and Remote Sensing Workshop. Made a presentation entitled: “Global croplands and their water use: using remote sensing and non-remote sensing approaches.

 

Sioux Falls, SD, USA. September 21, 2009. Landsat User’s Workshop. Made a presentation entitled: “Satellite Sensor Data normalization issues: A user's perspective”.

 

Siem Reap, Cambodia. June 20-24, 2009. Delta Research and Global Observation Network (DRAGON) meeting. Made presentation entitled: “Spatial Modeling for Decision Support in Selecting the Most Suitable Areas of Inland Valley Wetland Cultivation to Support Africa's Green and Blue Revolution”.

 

Siem Reap, Cambodia. June 20-24, 2009. Delta Research and Global Observation Network (DRAGON) meeting. Made presentation entitled: “The Use of Remote Sensing for the Characterization of Large River Basins: Studies Pertaining [to] Water Use, Water Productivity, Wetlands, and Agricultural Cropland Changes”

 

Flagstaff, AZ.  June 3, 2009. Made a presentation to U.S. Geological Survey HQ (Reston, Verginia on Webex) for the Dr. Ione Taylor (USGS Geography chief Scientists) on” “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands, Water, Carbon, Wetlands, and Food Security”

 

Menlo Park, California. May 20, 2009. Made a presentation at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region HQ entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Water and Food Security”.

 

Accra, Ghana. February 24-25, 2009.  Workshop on Development of Small Scale Lowland Rice Fields In the Inland Valleys of Africa February 24-25, 2009, Accra, Ghana. Japan-IWMI Collaborative Project. Presentation entitled: “Inland Valley Wetland Mapping and Characterization Using Remote Sensing:  Highlighting their Potential for Green and Blue revolution in Africa”.

 

Accra, Ghana. February 24-25, 2009.  Workshop on Development of Small Scale Lowland Rice Fields In the Inland Valleys of Africa February 24-25, 2009, Accra, Ghana. Japan-IWMI Collaborative Project. Conference paper entitled: A Spatial Model for the Best Site Selection of rice Cultivation in the Inland Valley Wetlands of Ghana using Remote Sensing and GIS”.

 

Flagstaff, USA. February 12, 2009. Made presentation entitled: “global irrigated area mapping (GIAM) and global map of rainfed cropland areas (GMRCA) at the end of the last millennium using remote sensing”. Presentations to USGS scientists.

 

Kyoto, Japan. February 2-3, 2009. Fifth Integrated Global Water Cycle Observations (IGWCO) meeting. Presentation entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security: Collaborations, Partnerships, and Capacity Building”.  

 

Kyoto, Japan. February 4-6, 2009. 3rd Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS) Asia Pacific Symposium. Presentation entitled: “Global Irrigated Area Map (GIAM) and Global Map of Rainfed Cropland Areas (GMRCA):  at the end of the last millennium using time-series remote sensing”.  

 

Kyoto, Japan. February 6-7, 2009. Asian Water Cycle Initiative (AWCI) of the 3rd Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS) Asia Pacific Symposium. Presentation entitled: “Water Productivity Mapping using Remote Sensing to solve Global Food Crisis”.

 

Kyoto, Japan. February 4-6, 2009. 3rd Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS) Asia Pacific Symposium. Paper entitled: Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Global Hydrologic Observing Network Architecture and Informatics by W. Pozzi,  , B. Fekete, M. Piasecki, J. Goodall, T. Oki, R. Lawford,  H. Kim,  A. M. Castronova, D. Cripe,  P. Fox, D. McGuinness, R. Raskin, C. J. Vorosmarty, P. Houser, P. Thenkabail, B. Doorn, R. Hartman, D. Matthews, H. Gupta, B. Imam, R. Schiffer, and E. L. Cox

 

Fort Collins, USA. January 6-8, 2009. Landsat Science Meeting discussions.

 

Denver, Colorado, USA. Nov. 16-20, 2008. The 17th William T. Pecora Memorial Remote Sensing Symposium. Global irrigated area map (GIAM) and Global Map of Rainfed Cropland Areas (GMRCA) at the end of the last millennium using time-series remote sensing. Presentation.

 

Denver, Colorado, USA. Nov. 16-20, 2008. The 17th William T. Pecora Memorial Remote Sensing Symposium. Resolution of Imagery and Irrigated Areas. Presentation.

 

Denver, Colorado, USA. Nov. 16-20, 2008. The 17th William T. Pecora Memorial Remote Sensing Symposium. Water Productivity Mapping (WPM) using Remote Sensing to support Grow More Crop per Drop. Presentation and Poster.

 

Denver, Colorado, USA. Nov. 16-20, 2008. The 17th William T. Pecora Memorial Remote Sensing Symposium. Sub-pixel area computation methods. Poster.

 

Denver, Colorado, USA. Nov. 16-20, 2008. The 17th William T. Pecora Memorial Remote Sensing Symposium. Global irrigated area mapping at 500 m (GIAM 500m) using MODIS time-series India: 30 classes. Poster.

 

Colombo, Sri Lanka. Nov. 10-14, 2008. Asian Conference on Remote Sensing (ACRS). Benchmarking Cotton Water Use and Productivity Using Spectral Indices. Poster.

 

Colombo, Sri Lanka. September 26, 2008. International Water Management Institute (Friday Seminar). "Water Productivity Mapping from Remote Sensing to Pin-Point Areas of Low and High WP and help Assist in Finding Solutions to Global Food Crisis”. Presentation.

 

Tel Aviv, Israel, May 13-15, 2008 (organized and lead by me along with Dr. Yafit Cohen of ARO). Workshop on “Water productivity mapping (WPM) and soil salinity mapping (SSM) through advanced remote sensing data and methods”. Israel-IWMI collaborative project. Hosted by Agricultural Research.

 

Accra, Ghana. March 17-18, 2008. project initiation workshop on: “Contribution of Shallow groundwater irrigation to livelihoods security and poverty reduction in White Volta Basin: current extent and future sustainability” funded by Challenge Program for Water and Food (CPWF). I am one of the PI’s.

 

Accra, Ghana. June 2, 2008. Wetland Project workshop (IWMI-Japan Collaborative project). Lecture on: “Spatial Models for best site selection for Rice Cultivation in the Inland Valleys”.

 

Landsat Science meeting, Reston, Virginia. July 15-17, 2008. Lecture on: “Developing ideal spectral signatures of irrigated areas for spectral matching techniques and decision trees”.

 

Geneva, Switzerland. July 21-24, 2008. IEEE water project meeting held at the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), Geneva. meeting, Reston, Virginia. July 15-17, 2008. Lecture on: 1. “Global Irrigated and Rainfed Cropland Areas and their  Water Use from Spaceborne Remote Sensing”, and 2. "Water Productivity Mapping from Remote Sensing to help grow “more crop per drop” and find Innovative Solutions to Global Food Crisis"

 

Accra, Ghana. November 29, 2007. “Methods and models for best (most suitable) site selections for inland valley wetland cultivation in the Kumasi area of Ghana”. This is a Japanese funded project carried out by IWMI, Ghana office.

 

Rome, Italy. October, 10, 2007. Workshop on harmonization of spatial information in support of agricultural development and food security” Gates foundation organized workshop for International Institutes. Gave a talk on “Natural resources: Water Resources and Irrigation”.

 

Boston University, Boston, USA. July 3, 2007. Invited speaker. “Global irrigated area mapping (GIAM) at various scales using remote sensing: methods and results”.

 

University of New Hamphshire, New Hampshire, USA, July 2, 2007. Invited speaker. Mini workshop on Agriculture, Irrigation, and Hydrology at Global Scale. Organized by Dr. Xiangming Xiao of the Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) grop of the University of New Hamphshire. I was the lead visiting speaker in the workshop. Gave lecture of  “Global irrigated area mapping (GIAM) at various scales using remote sensing: methods and results”.

 

NASA Ames, California, USA. June, 18, 2007. Invited speaker. “Global irrigated area mapping (GIAM) at various scales using remote sensing: methods and results”. The NASA web portal reported: “Scientist delivers seminar on mapping global irrigation” (see: http://center.arc.nasa.gov/index.php?tag=human-exploration).  Dr. Prasad Thenkabail, Principal Researcher of the Global Research Division and Head of the Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) divisions of the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) in Sri Lanka, gave a seminar to the Biospheric Science branch on June 18. He talked about “mapping global irrigated areas from remote sensing” which details his group’s work in providing comprehensive assessments of water management for agriculture. IWMI provides country specific statistics, maps and datasets of irrigated areas and rainfed croplands throughout the world.”

 

ESRI award. San Diego, California, USA. Attended. The annual International users conference to receive the “special achievement in GIS” awrd from ESRI president Mr. Jack Dangermond.

 

Landsat Science meeting, Corvallis, Oregon, USA. June 12, 2007. brief lecture on: “Global irrigated area mapping (GIAM) at various scales using remote sensing: methods and results”.

 

Beijing, China GIAM workshop. May 23, 2007. Conducted, coordinated, and lectured on Global irrigated area mapping (GIAM) for China.

 

New Delhi, India GIAM workshop. April 13, 2007. Conducted, coordinated, and lectured on Global irrigated area mapping (GIAM) for India.

 

Tashkent, Uzbekistan. April 16-18, 2007. Organized, coordinated, lectured on Water productivity mapping (WPM) and soil salinity mapping (SSM) projects for Central Asia. Lectured on “Understand, Measure, Model, and Map  Water Productivity and Soil Salinity” (Prasad S. Thenkabail, Chandrashekar M. Biradar, Alexander Platanov, Praveen Noojipady, and Jagath Vithanage).

 

Pretoria, South Africa. January 22-27, 2007. Lectured onWetland Mapping and Spatial Modeling for Change Detection and Study of Landscape Interactions in the Challenge Program Wetland sites of the Limpopo River Basin (Prasad S. Thenkabail, Wasantha Kulawardhana, and Manohar Velpuri). Presented at the Challenge Program Workshop on Wetlands held at Pretoria, South Africa during January 21-25, 2007.

 

Landsat Science meeting, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA. January 9, 2007. brief lecture on: “Global irrigated area mapping (GIAM) at various scales using remote sensing: methods and results”.

FAO, Rome, June 2006. lead speaker from IWMI (one lead speaker from IWMI and one from FAO). Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C.M., Turral, H., Noojipady, P., Li, Y., Vithanage, J., Dheeravath, V., Velpuri, M., and Cai, X., 2005. Satellite Sensor Based Global Irrigated Area Map @ 10km (GIAM10km), 500-m (GIAM500m), and 30-m (GIAM30m). GIAM workshop held at the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome, Italy, during June 25-26, 2006.

Hanoi, Vietnam, 2005. Contributed. Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C.M., Turral, H., and Schull, M. 2005. A Satellite Sensor Based Global Map of Irrigated Areas and Products. Presented at the 2nd Asian Conference on Remote Sensing (ACRS), held at Hanoi, Vietnam during November 7-11, 2005. 

New Delhi, India. Contributed. Smakhtin, V. Thenkabail, P, Gamage, N, Weragala, N and Hughes, D. (2005) Drought Assessment and Monitoring in South Asia using climate and remote sensing data. In: Proc of the IWRA XII World Water Congress: Water for Sustainable Development – Towards Innovative Solutions, 22-25 November 2005, New Delhi, India. Vol 3 pp 6.97- 6.100

IWMI Research Update, 2005. Research Update. Lead author. News of the progress and Impact of IWMI’s research. Issue 2, 2005. International Water Management Institute, Colombo, Sri Lanka. 

Pecora conference in USA- Global Map of Irrigated Areas, 2005. The First satellite sensor based Global Map of Irrigated Areas (GMIA) @ the end of the last mellenium. the Pecora 16 meeting “Global Priorities in Land Remote Sensing” held at Sioux Falls South Dakota, USA during October 23-27, 2005. (Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C.M., Turral, H., and Schull, M.).

CSI conference in Kenya- IWMI data storehouse pathway and GMIA, 2005. Science Applications of Spatial Data and Spatial Data Gateways @ IWMI. Presented at the CGIAR Consortium for Spatial Information, GeoSpatial Science Meeting and Planning Workshop held at Nairobi, Kenya during October 17-21st, 2005. (Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C.M., Islam, A., Vithanage, J., Noojipady, P., Dheeravath, V., Kulawardhana, W., Velpuri, M., Gunasinghe, S., and Alankara., R.).

GISSL conference in Sri Lanka- keynote address, 2005. IWMIDSP- Geospatial digital gateway : A free gateway to geospatial data for      Water and Natural Resources Management. Presented as a key Address in session 2 (Geoinformatics for Natural Resources Management) of the Second National Symposium on Geo-Informatics,  Kandy, Sri Lanka. August 26, 2005. (Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C.M., Islam, A., Noojipady, P.).

South Africa- wetland mapping, 2005. Wetland Mapping, Classification, Characterization, and Spatial Modeling: A Comprehensive Methodology discussion for Mapping @ Local to Global Levels and @ all scales. To the IWMI South Africa Wetland Research Team in Pretoria in June, 2005. (Thenkabail, P.S., Kulawardhana, W., Islam, A., Biradar, C.M., Gunasinghe., S.).

Uzbekistan- water productivity mapping, 2005. Mapping Water Productivity in Benchmark River Basins: Remote Sensing based Strategies. In IWMI Tashkent, Uzbekistan to initiate Water Productivity Mapping (WMP). Tashkent, Uzbekistan on Sept. 26, 2005. (Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C.M., Hugh. T., Manthrithillake, H., Vithanage, J.,).

India- water productivity mapping, 2005. Mapping Water Productivity in Benchmark River Basins: Remote Sensing based Strategies. In IWMI Hyderabad, India to initiate Water Productivity Mapping (WMP). Hyderabad, India, August, 2006. (Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C.M., Biggs. T., Murali Krishna, and Pardasarathi).

Iranian delegation Lecture in Colombo. Spatial Data in IWMI’s Research Agenda  Mapping, Classification, Characterization, and Spatial Modeling using Multi-Scale Time-Series Satellite Sensor Data. Presented to Iranian Delegation on May 2, 2005 @ IWMI HQ, Colombo, Sri Lanka. (Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C.M., Islam, A., Vithanage, J., Noojipady, P., Dheeravath, V., Kulawardhana, W., Velpuri, M., Gunasinghe, S., and Alankara., R.).

IWMI-Friday Seminar lecture, 2005. (Colombo). The First satellite sensor based Global Map of Irrigated Areas (GMIA) @ the end of the last mellenium. The International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Friday Seminar, October 14, 2005. (Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C.M., Turral, H., and Schull, M.).

UDA-Tsunami lecture, 2005 (Colombo). Tsunami Satellite Sensor Data Catalogue (TSSDC) @ IWMI: Making disaster management possible. The Urban Developmental Authority (UDA), Sri Lanka. March, 2005. (Thenkabail, P.S., Abayawardana., S.).

Uniliver-Knowledge base system lecture, 2005. (Colombo). KBS-Lanka nowledge Base System for Sri Lanka for disaster preparedness, rapid response, and assessment. Presented to the Uniliver board in order to seek fund for the aforementioned project (which was funded by 60k over 2 years). (Thenkabail, P.S., Smakhtin, V., Abayawardana., S., Gamage., N.).

IWMI-Metadata lecture, 2005. (Colombo). IWMI Metadata in FGDC Clearinghouse-A Working Model for Rapid Metadata Creation. Presented to IWMI Director General and Others (Noojipady., P., Thenkabail, P.S., marchand, P., and Zomer, R.).

MODIS Vegetation Workshop II. 2004. Attended the MODIS Vegetation Workshop II held at University of Montana at Missoula, Montana, USA during August 16-20, 2004. Also made a poster presentation entitled: “Mapping irrigated areas in Ganges river basin using MODIS time-series data”.

 

International workshop on drought assessment and mitigation in South West Asia, 2004. Crystal Room, Taj Samudra Hotel, Colombo, Sri Lanka, 7 –8 October 2004. Presented “Drought Assessment and Monitoring in SouthWest Asia using remote sensing”.

 

Remote sensing and GIS workshop for Trainers and Practitioners, 2004. entitled: “Observing River Basins from Space-Why is it Important for IWMI?: A Remote Sensing and GIS (RS/GIS) Workshop for IWMI by IWMI”: (a) June 21-25, 2004 specialists workshop, (b)  June 28th awareness workshop. Held in Board room of IWMI Headquarters,  Sri Lanka. My role: chief organizer, chief coarse designer with 5 main presentations. These RS/GIS training materials are available at: http://www.iwmidsp.org

 

 

Challenge Program for Water and Food baseline conference. Nairobi, Kenya. 2003. Baseline conference on Challenge Program for Water and Food. November 2-6, 2003. Presentation: Applying Remote Sensing and GIS Datasets for Monitoring Indicators in Challenge Program Basins: A vision for Databases,  Data Products, Knowledge Bases, and Science Applications.

 

International Water Management Institute (WMI) Friday Seminar. Colombo, Sri Lanka 2003. Friday Seminar. Presentation: Remote Sensing in The Beginning of the New Millennium-Current Challenges and Future Possibilities for Integrating RS/GIS technologies in IWMI’s Research Agenda.

 

Challenge Program for Water and Food Data Workshop. Colombo. Sri Lanka. 2003. Presentation: Data workshop for the Benchmark Basins within the Challenge Program for Water and Food. May, 2003. The Use of Remote Sensing for the Characterization of Large River Basins: Issues for the Challenge Program’s Benchmark basins.

 

Pecora 2002.  Denver, Colorado. Pecora 15 Land Satellite Information IV. November 12 - 14, 2002, Denver, Colorado. Presentation: Biomass Estimation and Carbon Sequestration in the Oil Palm Plantations of African Derived Savannas using IKONOS Data.

 

NASA. High Spatial Resolution Commercial Imagery Workshop, March 25-27, 2002, USGS, Reston, Verginia, USA. Made a poster presentation entitled: "Oil palm biomass estimation and carbon stock calculations in the derived savannas of Africa using IKONOS data".

 

Upper Mid-West Aerospace Consortium (UMAC). March 28, 2002, Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA. Made a conference call presentation entitled: "Natural Resources and Environmental Assessment and Management  Issues in the Eco-Regions of Africa using Satellite Sensor Data of Three Eras".

 

 

Cameroon. Field work and seminar for Characterization of Eco Regions in Africa (CERA) project. March 3-15, 2002. (in Collaboration with the International Institue of Tropical Agriculture, IITA).

 

USEPA. A remote sensing and GIS accuracy assessment symposium, December 11-13, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.  Will make a presentation entitled: "Accuracy assessment for determining best hyperspectral wavebands for agriculture and precision farming". Invited lecture. Paper  as book chapter in 2002.

 

NASA. EO-1 Hyperion and ALI data users workshop, November 28-29, 2001, Maryland, USA. Attended.

RapidEye (Germany). Information workshop, November 18-20, Munich, Germany.  Advised as one of the 5 Advisory board member for RapidEye, A German company specializing in launchings, operating, and marketing satellite sensor data for agriculture, forestry, and natural resources.

 

Veridian. Third International Conference on Geospatial Information in Agriculture and Forestry, November 5-7, 2001, Denver, Colorado, USA. Made a presentation entitled: "Strengths and limitations of hyperspectral and hyperspatial datasets in agricultural crops". Paper in conference proceedings.

 

Veridian. Third International Conference on Geospatial Information in Agriculture and Forestry, November 5-7, 2001, Denver, Colorado, USA. Made a presentation entitled: "Characterization of Humid-forest and Savanna ecoregions of West and Central Africa using satellite sensor data of three eras". Paper in Conference proceedings.

 

Karnataka Remote Sensing Center (India), July 16, 2001, Karnataka, India. Made a presentation entitled: "Hyperspectral and hyperspatial datasets for agriculture and natural resources". Invited lecture.

 

ASPRS. Gateway to the New Millennium, April 23-27, Annual Conference of the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS), St. Louis, Missouri. Attended.

 

NASA. High Spatial Resolution Commercial Imagery Workshop, March 19-22, 2001, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA. Made a presentation entitled: "Characterizations of humid forest and savanna ecoregions of West and Central Africa using satellite sensor data of three eras".

 




                           

My Science Topics


Science Topic
Subtopic
Geographic Analysis and Mappinggeospatial analysis
Geographic Analysis and Mappingmaps and atlases
Geographic Analysis and Mappingremote sensing
Geographic Analysis and Mappingspatial analysis
Natural Resourcesforest resources
Natural Resourcesnatural resource management
Natural Resourceswater resources
Ecology and Environmentecosystems
Ecology and Environmentenvironmental assessment
Ecology and Environmentforests
Ecology and Environmentfreshwater ecosystems
Ecology and Environmentwetlands
Atmosphere and Climateclimate change
Atmosphere and Climatedroughts
Atmosphere and Climateglobal change
Hydrologic Processeshydrology
Hydrologic Processesrunoff
Natural Hazardsdroughts
Natural Hazardsfloods
Natural Hazardstsunamis
Water Resourcesaquifers
Water Resourcesdroughts
Water Resourcesfloodplains
Water Resourcesfloods
Water Resourcesground water
Water Resourcesirrigation
Water Resourcesrunoff
Water Resourcessurface water
Water Resourceswater budget
Water Resourceswater supply and demand
Water Resourceswater use
Techniques and Methodsremote sensing
Plants and Animalsplants
Plants and Animalsvegetation



My USGS Science Strategy Areas

Climate Variability & Change

A Water Census of the United States

1. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation and Agricultural Crops; 2. Global croplands and their Water Use for Food Security; 3. WaterSMART; 4. Water Productivity (crop per drop); 5. CEOS and GEO; 6. Water for the World; and 7. Wetlands for Africa

Image of Current Focus for 1. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation and Agricultural Crops; 2. Global croplands and their Water Use for Food Security; 3. WaterSMART; 4. Water Productivity (crop per drop); 5. CEOS and GEO; 6. Water for the World; and 7. Wetlands for Africa

1. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation and Agricultural Productivity

http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439845370;jsessionid=tg8zyfgPA8f4L3HD05szog

 

The goal of the “hyperspectral remote sensing of vegetation and Agricultural Crops” research is to investigate advances made is applications of hyperspectral remote sensing data, methods, and models during the last 40+ years in understanding, modeling, and mapping terrestrial vegetation and agricultural crops. The goal encompasses establishing knowledge gain as well as knowledge gaps. Some of these findings is reported in the new book on “Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation” (Thenkabail et al., 2011; Publisher:Taylor and Francis inc.). The advent of spaceborne hyperspectral sensors or imaging spectroscopy (e.g., NASA’s Hyperion, ESA’s PROBA, and upcoming Italy’s ASI’s Prisma, Germany’s DLR’s EnMAP, Japanese HIUSI, NASA’s HyspIRI) as well as the advances made in processing when handling large volumes of hyperspectral data have generated tremendous interest in advancing the  hyperspectral applications’ knowledge base to large areas.

 

Advances made in using hyperspectral data, relative to broadband data, include: (a) significantly improved characterization and modeling of a wide array of biophysical and biochemical properties of vegetation, (b) ability to discriminate plant species and vegetation types with high degree of accuracy, (c) reducing uncertainties in determining net primary productivity or carbon assessments from terrestrial vegetation, (d) improved crop productivity and water productivity models,  (e) ability to assess stress resulting from causes such as management practices, pests and disease, water deficit or water excess, and (f) establishing more sensitive wavebands and indices to study vegetation characteristics.

 

The chapters in the book (Thenkabail et al., 2011) present and discuss topics such as: (1) hyperspectral sensors and their characteristics, (2) methods of overcoming the Hughes phenomenon, (3) characterizing biophysical and biochemical properties, (4) advances made in using hyperspectral data in modeling evapotranspiration or actual water use by plants, (5) study of phenology, light use efficiency, and gross primary productivity, (5) improved accuracies in species identification and land cover classifications, and (6) applications in precision farming.

 

Book has 30 Chapters, 100+ authors. Book discusses great advances made by using ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne hyperspectral narrow-band data in providing practical solutions in modeling and mapping vegetation by: (a) quantifying agricultural crops as to their biophysical and harvest yield characteristics, (b) modeling forest canopy biochemical properties, (c) establishing plant and soil moisture conditions, (d) detecting crop stress and disease, (e) mapping leaf chlorophyll content as it influences crop production, (g) identifying plants affected by contaminants such as arsenic, and (h) demonstrating sensitivity to plant nitrogen content, and (i) invasive species mapping. The ability to significantly better quantify, model, and map plant chemical, physical, and water properties will be demonstrated and its utility highlighted.

 

Our current hyperspectral remote sensing research is also targeted towards further advancing our knowledge in use and applications of hyperspectral data, methods, and models in areas of great societal importancerelevance. For example, we describe ongoing research effort on global food security and use of hyperspectral remote sensing in such a effort. Global food security demands not only increased crop productivity (productivity per unit of land; kgm2), but also increased water productivity (productivity per unit of water or “crop per drop”; kgm3) in the twenty-first century, in order to meet higher food demands for ballooning populations from existing cropland areas and existing blue water (irrigated areas) and green water (rainfed areas) allocations for agriculture. Also, climate models are already predicting that the hottest seasons on record will become the norm by the end of the century-an outcome that bodes ill for feeding the worldSo, in order to promote a planet-sustaining food production capability, we need a more sophisticated understanding, modeling, and mapping of global croplands, their water use, and their crop and water productivities. Therefore, this research will focus on hyperspectral remote sensing based crop productivity (CP) and water productivity (WP) studies of eight major world crops (wheat, corn, rice, barley, soybeans, pulses, cotton, and alfalfa) that in total occupy 69% of all global cropland areas. In order to achieve this goal, we will conduct extensive research in California’s Central Valley where the above mentioned eight world crops occupy about 55% of the total cropland area (about 10 million acres) of the valley. Further, we will make use of our existing rich global hypserspectral database of the 8 crops from distinct agroecosystems of the world and run our CP and WP models over these different areas for comparative analysis with results from California’s Central valley.

 

The overarching goal of this project is to develop and analyze crop productivity and water productivity models and maps (CPMs and WPMs) of 8 major world crops using hyperspectral data from AVIRIS-classicAVIRIS-NG, MASTER, Hyperion, and local spectroradiometers (ASD Fieldspec 400-2500 nm, D&F model 102F 2000-16000 nm, and Thermo-Nicolet Nexus 670 FTIR spectrometer 250-25000 nm) data and compare them with the performance of Landsat and other broadband sensors (e.g., SPOT, IRS, Quickbird, IKONOS, Rapideye, Geoeye, Worldview-2). The hyperspectral data will simulate all of the HyspIRI bands and will be supported by a large collection of in-situ biological and spectroradiometer data of about 10,500 data points, of which about 9,000 points already available to us, for the 6 study areas of the World and rest collected during FY13 and FY14 in California. Specifically, we have 5 key planned contributions: Objective 1: Develop hyperspectral vegetation indices (HVIs) that advance our understanding leading to better models and maps of the major agricultural crop biophysical and biochemical quantities. Identify and establish optimized hyperspectral narrowband indices (HNBs) and HVIs for specific biophysical and biochemical characterization including: (a) anthocyanin, (b) carotenoid, (c) chlorophyll, (d) plant water, (e) biomass, (f) LAI, (g) light use efficiency, (h) plant nitrogen, (i) plant stress, (j) lignin, (k) cellulose, and (l) plant litter. Objective 2: Overcome the Hughes phenomenon (or the curse of high dimensionality) of hyperspectral data by detecting and eliminating redundant bands through unique data mining techniques such as Lambda by Lambda contour plots of R-square values involving 12,246 unique HVI models for each variable of each crop; Objective 3: Identify HNBs, HVIs, and thermal bands (TIRBs) , that: (a) best separate crop types, and (b) increase accuracies in classifying crop types, when compared with broadbands (BBs); Objective 4: Model, and map crop and water productivities involving surface energy balance modeling (SEBAL) that uses a combination of HNBs, HVIs, and TIRBs and compare them with the models and maps developed using broadbands (BBs); and Objective 5: Create a dynamic phenophase hyperspectral library (e.g., vegetative, tillering, harvest stage) of the 8 major crops of the world within and between agroecosystems.

 

References:

Thenkabail, P.S., Lyon, G.J., and Huete, A. 2011. Book entitled: “Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation”. CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York.  Pp. 781 (80+ pages in color).

Reviews of this book: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439845370

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Gumma, M.K., 2012. Selection of hyperspectral narrowbands (HNBs) and composition of hyperspectral two-band vegetation indices (HVIs) for biophysical characterization and discrimination of crop types using field reflectance and Hyperion/EO-1 data. . IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote
Sensing” (JSTARS). Accepted in June 2012.

 

Mariotto, I.,  Thenkabail, P.S., Huete, H., Slonecker, T., Platonov, A., 2012. Hyperspectral versus Multispectral Crop- Biophysical Modeling and Type Discrimination for the HyspIRI Mission. Remote Sensing of Environment. In review.

 

*******************************************************************************************************************

2A. Global Croplands and Food Security

https://powellcenter.usgs.gov/globalcroplandwater/

 

Monitoring global croplands (GCs) is imperative for ensuring sustainable water and food security to the people of the world in the Twenty-first Century (Thenkabail, 2012, Thenkabail, 2010). However, the currently available cropland products (Thenkabail et al., 2012, 2011, 2009a, 2009b) suffer from major limitations such as: (1) Absence of precise spatial location of the cropped areas; (b) Coarse resolution nature of the map products with significant uncertainties in areas, locations, and detail; (b) Uncertainties in differentiating irrigated areas from rainfed areas; (c) Absence of crop types and cropping intensities; and (e) Absence of a dedicated webdata portal for the dissemination of cropland products.

 

Therefore, our project aims to close these gaps through a Global Cropland Area Database at nominal 30m (GCAD30) with 4 distinct products:

1. Cropland extentarea,

2. Crop types with focus on 8 crops that occupy 70% of the global cropland areas,

3. Irrigated versus rainfed, and

4. Cropping intensities: single, double, triple, and continuous cropping. 

The project will disseminate these data and products through the USGS Powell Center Global Croplands Working Group web portal (https://powellcenter.usgs.gov/globalcroplandwater/) which will also include web mapping for user interaction, feedback, and improvements.

 

First, the above 4 products will be generated for GCAD for nominal year 2010 (GCAD2010) based on Landsat 30m Global Land Survey 2010 (GLS2010) fused with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 250m NDVI monthly maximum value composites (MVC) of 2009-2011 data, and suite of secondary data (e.g., long-term precipitation, temperature, GDEM elevation). GCAD30 will be produced using three mature cropland mapping algorithms (CMAs):

 

1.  Spectral matching techniques (SMT); http://www.iwmigiam.org; Thenkabail et al., 2011, 2009a,b; 2007);

2. A cropland classification algorithm (ACCA) that is rule-based: (Thenkabail et al., 2012; e.g.,http://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/folder/4f79f1b7e4b0009bd827f548); and

3. Hierarchical segmentation (HSeg) algorithm: (http://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/606.3/TILTON/).

 

The SMTs will be preferred for parts of the world with large volumes of field-plot and other geo-specific map data. ACCA will be applied in regions with sparse or unreliable field-plot data, but where numerous other sources of data and large volume of training data generated from HSeg exist. Further, HSeg will be used in conjunction with SMTs and ACCAs to help improve classification accuracies and generate training data over highly fragmented croplands.

 

Second, the same 4 products will be generated for GCAD1990 which will combine GLS1990, AVHRR 1989-1991, secondary climate and topographic data and national statistical data. Third, GCAD four decades will characterize the global cropland dynamics from the 1980s to present based on AVHRR 8 km (1982-2000) and MODIS 250m (2001-2017) continuous monthly time-series. All the products will be extensively evaluated for accuracies, errors, and uncertainties using data such as: (i) 25% of 20,000+ in-situ data, (ii) several thousand globally well distributed very high resolution (sub-meter to 5 meter) Commercial Imagery Derived Requirement (CIDR) Database of USGS, available free of cost to the project through the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (https://warp.nga.mil/),  (iii) our ongoing collaborative work over large areas, and (iv) maps from national systems (e.g., USDA CDL; see global letters of support).

 

GCAD30 will make significant contributions to Earth System Data Records (ESDRs), Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Agriculture and Water Societal Beneficial Areas (GEO Ag. SBAs), GEO Global Agricultural Monitoring Initiative (GEO GLAM), and the recent “Big Data” initiative by the White House. The project has the support of USGS Working Group on Global Croplands (https://powellcenter.usgs.gov/globalcroplandwater/;

http://powellcenter.usgs.gov/current_projects.php#GlobalCroplandsAbstract).

 

References:

Thenkabail P.S., Knox J.W., Ozdogan, M., Gumma, M.K., Congalton, R.G., Wu, Z., Milesi, C., Finkral, A., Marshall, M., Mariotto, I., You, S. Giri, C. and Nagler, P. 2012.  Assessing future risks to agricultural productivity, water resources and food security: how can remote sensing help?. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing, August 2012 Special Issue on Global Croplands: Highlight Article. Accepted. In press.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., 2012. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites has released the 2012 The Earth Observation Handbook, Special Edition for the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, June 20-22, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  USGS research geographer Prasad Thenkabail was the lead contributor for the Global Food Security Case Study:

http://www.eohandbook.com/eohb2012/case_studies_global_food_security.html    

 

Thenkabail, P.S.,  Hanjra, M.A., Dheeravath, V., Gumma, M. 2011. Book Chapter #  16:  Global Croplands and Their Water Use Remote Sensing and Non-Remote Sensing Perspectives. In the Book entitled: “Advances in Environmental Remote Sensing: Sensors, Algorithms, and Applications”. Taylor and Francis Edited by Dr. Qihao Weng. Pp. 383-419.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. 2010. Guest Editor: Special issue on “Global Croplands” for Journal Remote Sensing. Total: 22 papers. http://www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing/special_issues/croplands/.  

 

Thenkabail. P., Lyon, G.J., Turral, H., and Biradar, C.M. 2009. Book entitled: “Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security” (CRC Press- Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, London, New York.  Pp. 556 (48 pages in color). Published in June, 2009.

Reviews of this book:

http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781420090093

http://gfmt.blogspot.com/2011/05/review-remote-sensing-of-global.html

 

Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar C.M., Noojipady, P., Dheeravath, V., Li, Y.J., Velpuri, M., Gumma, M., Reddy, G.P.O., Turral, H., Cai, X. L., Vithanage, J., Schull, M., and Dutta, R. 2009. Global irrigated area map (GIAM), derived from remote sensing, for the end of the last millennium. International Journal of Remote Sensing. 30(14): 3679-3733. July, 20, 2009.

 

Thenkabail, P.S., GangadharaRao, P., Biggs, T., Krishna, M., and Turral, H., 2007. Spectral Matching Techniques to Determine Historical Land use/Land cover (LULC) and Irrigated Areas using Time-series AVHRR Pathfinder Datasets in the Krishna River Basin, India. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing. 73(9): 1029-1040. (Second Place Recipients of the 2008 John I. Davidson ASPRS President’s Award for Practical papers).

 

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2B. Cropland Water Use and Food Security

https://powellcenter.usgs.gov/globalcroplandwater/

 

Global climate change is putting unprecedented pressure on global croplands and their water use,  vital for ensuring future food security for the world’s rapidly expanding human population. The end of the green green revolution (productivity per unit of land) era has meant declining global per capita agricultural production requiring immediate policy responses to safeguard food security amidst global climate change and economic turbulence. Above all, global croplands are water guzzlers, consuming between 60-90% of all human water use. With increasing urbanization, industrialization, and other demands (e.g., bio-fuels) on water there is increasing pressure to reduce agricultural water use by  producing more food from existing or even reduced: (a) areas of croplands (more crop per unit area); and (b) quantities of water (more crop per unit of water). Given this background, a critical and urgent question facing humanity in the twenty-first century is, how can we continue to feed the World’s ballooning populations in the twenty-first century in a scenario where croplands are decreasing (e.g., taken away for bio-fuels, urbanization), and water use is increasing (e.g., as a result of increasing temperature in a changing climate)?. Our team will look into new and emerging strategies for increasing agricultural productivity which will consider and analyze: i) growing more of crops that consume less water (e.g., more wheat, less rice); ii) increasing water use efficiency leading to a blue revolution (“more crop per drop”); iii) educating people to eat less water-consuming food (e.g., more vegetables and grains, less meat; more local and seasonal foods); and iv) emphasizing rainfed crop productivity to reduce stress on water-intensive irrigated croplands (Thenkabail, 2010, Thenkabail et al., 2010).

 

To address the above questions adequately and find solid scientific solutions, we need to fill an existing knowledge gap: the precise estimation of global croplands, their water use, and their locations. At present, the best available data only provide coarse resolution global cropland maps (see previous section) which have huge uncertainties in: (a) estimating cropland areas, crop types, cropping intensities, and their precise location, and (b) differentiating irrigated areas from rainfed areas. So, the critical questions that will be asked and answered on the topic will be to carefully consider how we can identify, conceptualize, develop and recommend (by reviewing ongoing work, brainstorming new pathways, creating a knowledge warehouse through series of publications in top journals) methods and techniques for consistent and unbiased estimates of agricultural croplands over space and time by (a) accounting for watering sources (e.g., irrigated, rainfed, other land use/ land cover (LULC)) of croplands, (b) elaborating on cropping intensities over a year, particularly in parts of the world where two or three crops may be grown in one year, but where cropping intensities are not known or recorded in secondary statistics; (c) defining the actual area and spatial distribution of croplands in the world; (d) determining change in croplands extent or intensity (e.g., expansion of croplands into natural vegetation, reduction due to urbanization and biofuels, change in intensity of cropping); and (e) assessing accuracies, errors, and uncertainties.

 

References:

Thenkabail P.S., Hanjra M.A., Dheeravath V., Gumma M. A. 2010.  A Holistic View of Global Croplands and Their Water Use for Ensuring Global Food Security in the 21st Century through Advanced Remote Sensing and Non-remote Sensing Approaches. Remote Sensing open access journal. 2(1):211-261. doi:10.3390/rs2010211.  http://www.mdpi.com/2072-4292/2/1/211.

 

Thenkabail, P.S. 2010. Guest Editor: Special issue on “Global Croplands” for Journal Remote Sensing. Total: 22 papers. http://www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing/special_issues/croplands/.  

 

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3. WaterSMART (Sustain and Manage America's Resources for Tomorrow) Project

http://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/folder/4f79f1b7e4b0009bd827f548

https://my.usgs.gov/globalcroplandwater/?q=content/models-algorithms

 

Within the WaterSMART (Sustain and Manage America’s Resources for Tomorrow) Project my involvement is in a sub-project “Development of a National Framework For Monitoring Water Use on Irrigated Lands through Advanced Remote Sensing and Surface Energy Modeling”. Estimating water use on irrigated lands in the U.S., including croplands and urban lands such as golf courses and parks, requires knowledge of their locations, surface areas, seasonal cycles, and rates of evapotranspiration.  Remote sensing can address all of these questions, though there is no single type of imagery that can answer them all.  Joint use of several types, drawing on the strengths of each, is required.  We propose an approach that makes use of existing high resolution orthophotography to establish locations of potentially irrigated lands, and multispectral data from Landsat and Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to determine crop type or landscape setting (golf course/parks/domestic) and evapotranspiration rates (consumptive use).  For clarification, irrigation “water use” includes water applied to plants to sustain healthy growth, as well as water used for other purposes such as dust suppression, or field preparation, or water lost in conveyance to the crop. In the urban setting, it includes water for irrigation on golf courses or other public spaces such as parks. Consumptive use refers to that part of the total water use (or withdrawal) that is evapotranspired (ET), or otherwise removed from the immediate water environment and not available for use. The basic unit of analysis for this study will be at the 30 mfield level, providing flexibility in aggregating results to counties, hydrologic units, irrigation districts, census blocks, or other administrative units.  Partnership and coordination of activities with USDA, Bureau of Reclamation, state agencies, NGOs, and local water districts are foreseen to achieve technical efficiencies and credibility of results.

 

Within this sub-project (“Development of a National Framework For Monitoring Water Use on Irrigated Lands through Advanced Remote Sensing and Surface Energy Modeling”), my specific involvement is to develop automated cropland classification algorithms (ACCA’s; Thenkabail et al., 2012; Wu and Thenkabail, 2012): http://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/folder/4f79f1b7e4b0009bd827f548

https://my.usgs.gov/globalcroplandwater/?q=content/models-algorithms

using advanced remote sensing data, approaches, algorithms, and methods. The goal is to support accurate estimation of water use on irrigated lands in the U.S., including croplands and urban lands such as golf courses and parks, requires knowledge of their locations, surface areas, seasonal cycles, and rates of evapotranspiration.  Specific objectives include mapping irrigated and rainfed cropland areas using ACCA’s and multi-sensor remote sensing involving:

A. existing high resolution orthophotography to establish locations of potentially irrigated lands (vector boundaries of these may be available andor have to be digitized),

B. multispectral data from Landsat; and

C. Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to determine crop type or landscape setting (golf course/parks/domestic) and evapotranspiration rates (consumptive use). 

The work will involve uncertainty analysis (through assessment of accuracies and errors), field checking, and coordination with other project partners (a number of national entities).

 

References:

Thenkabail. P.S. Wu, Z., Verdin, J., and Rowland, J. 2012. An automated cropland classification algorithm (ACCA) using Fusion of Landsat, MODIS, secondary, and in-situ data. Remote Sensing Open Access Journal. In Review.

 

Wu, Z., Thenkabail, P.S. 2012. An automated cropland classification algorithm for California using multi-sensor remote sensing data fusion. In preparation.

 

Thenkabail P.S., Knox J.W., Ozdogan, M., Gumma, M.K., Congalton, R.G., Wu, Z., Milesi, C., Finkral, A., Marshall, M., Mariotto, I., You, S. Giri, C. and Nagler, P. 2012.  Assessing future risks to agricultural productivity, water resources and food security: how can remote sensing help?. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing, August 2012 Special Issue on Global Croplands: Highlight Article. Accepted. In press.

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4. Water Productivity Studies to “Save Water”

 

Given that irrigated agriculture accounts for nearly 80% of all human water use in California, the

central goal of this research is to determine the amount of water that can be saved by various

scenarios of improved water productivity (WP expressed as kg/m3; more crop per drop) in the

irrigated croplands of California. This will be achieved by integrating multi-sensor remote

sensing (RS) data with surface energy balance modeling (evapotranspiration or ET modeling for

water use by crops), agro-meteorological data, water withdrawal data, and field measured crop

biophysical and yield data in a geographical information system (GIS) spatial modeling

framework. Methods and protocols of agricultural water productivity (WP) will be developed for

the State of California, the most agriculturally developed state of the country. The proposed

methods and protocols will involve five broad steps: (a) Irrigated Cropland Area Mapping

(ICAM, ha); (b) Crop Productivity Mapping (CPM, kg/m2) though spectro-biophysical modeling; (c) Water Use Mapping (WUM, m3/ha) through surface energy balance modeling (ET modeling); (d) Water Productivity Mapping (WPM, kg/m3) through a simple ratio of CPM and WUM; and (e) developing a spatial decision support system (DSS) for government agencies and farmers to determine where, how, and by how much water can be saved through improved water

productivity. The study will focus on 5 major irrigated, commercial crops (rice, corn, wheat,

alfalfa and cotton) cultivated in California. These 5 crops occupy about 40% of the total cropland

area (10 million acres) of California and are the dominant water consumers. The study will use

hyperspectral, hyperspatial and advanced multispectral data for WP mapping and determine the

associated accuracies, errors, and uncertainties of the model and map products.

 

Recent research (Marshall and Thenkabail, Ongoing; Mariotto, Thenkabail and others., 2012; Platonov, Thenkabail and others, 2008) has shown that the biggest possible saving in water is likely to come from growing more food with less water [increasing agricultural water productivity (WP) or “more crop per drop”]. Currently there are tremendous differences in the quantum of water used to produce a unit of grain within and between farm fields in various parts of the world as a result of different water and farmland management techniques. This opens up an opportunity to study the causes of differences in water use to produce a unit of grain, pin-point areas where these differences occur, and develop approaches of increasing water productivity. So, a central strategy of this action research will be to build advanced remote sensing, water-use modeling, and scenario analysis to identify areas of low WP and to quantify the volume of “new water” made available if we increase WP of croplands. This “new water” can then be diverted to environmental and urban uses or simply held as “water bank” for lean years.

 

Overarching goal of this proposed research is to develop methods and protocols for modeling and mapping water productivity (WP) in the irrigated croplands of California’s Central Valley and to quantify water savings that may be re-allocated to other urban, environmental, or agricultural uses (or simply stored in a “water bank”) using hyperspectral, hyperspatial, and advanced multi-spectral remote sensing data. These scenarios are critical to compare different allocation policies and their impacts on users, including the environment. It is important that these scenarios reflect the current political framework and projected climatic change in order to be relevant.

 

References:

Platonov, A., Thenkabail, P.S., Biradar, C., Cai, X., Gumma, M., Dheeravath, V., Cohen, Y., Alchanatis, V., Goldshlager, N., Ben-Dor, E., Vithanage, J., Manthrithilake, H., Kendjabaev, Sh., and Isaev. S. 2008. Water Productivity Mapping (WPM) using Landsat ETM+ Data for the Irrigated Croplands of the Syrdarya River Basin in Central Asia. Sensors Journal, 8(12), 8156-8180; DOI:  10.3390/s8128156. http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/8/12/8156/pdf.

 

Marshall, M., Thenkabail, P.S. Ongoing. USGS Mendenhall Research (Mendenhall Fellow: Mike Marshall, Post Doc.; Advisor: Prasad Thenkabail).

 

Mariotto, I.,  Thenkabail, P.S., Huete, H., Slonecker, T., Platonov, A., 2012. Hyperspectral versus Multispectral Crop- Biophysical Modeling and Type Discrimination for the HyspIRI Mission. Remote Sensing of Environment. In review.

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5. CEOSGEO Initiatives

http://www.eohandbook.com/eohb2012/case_studies_global_food_security.html

 

I have been serving as the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Global Coordinator for the Agriculture Societal Benefit Area (SBA) of Group on Earth Observations (GEO)-often called the CEOS Ag. SBA Coordinator.  This involves working with the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS).  task leads within the Ag SBA and identifying what CEOS can do for them. The work includes periodically attending the CEOSGEOGEOSS task team meetings, usually about quarterly CEOS telecons, occasional CEOS workshops, and CEOS plenary meetings.  In general, I would guess 4 or 5 meetings a year.  The other role that I have is on the CEOS Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Constellations team. One of the key roles of CEOS Ag. SBA is the task on Global Agricultural Monitoring (GLAM).

 

Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Task AG-07-03: Global Agricultural Monitoring System (GLAM): A common vision for the functionality of the GEO Agricultural Monitoring System of Systems was developed under the following main themes: : (a) Agricultural production monitoring; (b) Famine early warning; (c) Monitoring agricultural land use change; and Seasonal to annual agricultural forecasting; and (d) risk reduction. The implementation of the GEO Task AG-07-03 requires free, open, and timely access to satellite data and products for global agriculture monitoring. Thus the GEO Secretariat is establishing the GEO data policy that: (a) adopts equitable pricing policies for coarse and moderate resolution data resulting in free and open data access and data sharing; (b) encourages a reduction in price of very fine resolution (1-10m) data; (c) helps minimize delays in data access, enabling timely assessment of crop condition, and (d) gives special attention to enhancing the capacity of developing country data users and collectors.

 

Joint Experiments on Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM): The GEO Global Agriculture Monitoring Community of Practice (CoP) recognizes that in order to build this system of systems it is necessary to start with a set of near term tasks that are feasible and realistic. Therefore, during the 2009 GEO Beijing Workshop a near-term implementation plan was developed under four near-term initiatives. One of these initiatives is the establishment of the JECAM.

 

GEO AG-07-03 Space Agency Data Requirement through Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS): On behalf of the Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Virtual Constellation of the CEOS, there is a request for global space agencies support and cooperation for the acquisition of satellite data the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Task AG-07-03: Global Agricultural Monitoring System of Systems, jointly led by Canada, the European Commission, and the United States. This GEO Task provides a much-needed framework for a concerted international effort to improve global agricultural monitoring capabilities and enhance food security through the use of remote sensing data. An important initiative within AG-07-03 is known as the Joint Experiments on Crop Assessments and Monitoring (JECAM).  Further information on the Task and the JECAM initiative is provided in the enclosed summary.  To help demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, CEOS Members are asked to provide remote sensing data over an initial set of sites selected by the JECAM Project Office:  JECAM China (3 sites); JECAM Canada; JECAM Argentina; JECAM Brazil; JECAM Ethiopia, JECAM Mexico, JECAM Europe-Flevoland and JECAM Ukraine. The sites are approximately 20km radius. There are already some examples of space agency participation which will support JECAM. At present, NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data are a major source for agricultural monitoring systems, and thus both the timely delivery of these data and the continuity of this class of observations is fundamental for the success of a global agricultural monitoring system. MODIS data which have been collected since 2000 are currently freely available for the JECAM sites. Similarly, a partnership with the GEO Task DA-09-03 led by the USGS and NASA has been fostered to develop a global moderate resolution, ortho-rectified dataset (60-30m) anchored by Landsat and including other sources of satellite data for 2010. This project will build on the previous Global Land Surveys for 1975, 1990, 2000, and 2005. Data from these initiatives are available for the JECAM sites for the monitoring of agricultural land use change. To overcome the challenges facing global agriculture, national governments and international organizations will need to make an unprecedented commitment for coordinated observations and data delivery, to enhance agricultural monitoring capabilities and ensure full utilization of remote sensing data on a long-term, operational basis.

 

References:

Thenkabail, P.S., 2012. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites has released the 2012 The Earth Observation Handbook, Special Edition for the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, June 20-22, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  USGS research geographer Prasad Thenkabail was the lead contributor for the Global Food Security Case Study:

http://www.eohandbook.com/eohb2012/case_studies_global_food_security.html  

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6. Water for the World, A IEEE Project

http://www.ieee-earth.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/final-A-Blueprint-for-Water-For-the-World-November-2010.pdf

 

I am a co-Lead (with Dr. Tom Wiener) for the IEEE Water for the World Project Project Leader Responsibilities

·       Coordinate all efforts to achieve Water for the World goals

·       Oversee the completion of the Phase One Actionable Vision

·       Guide and coordinate Pilot Project activities

·       Develop Integrated Pilot Project Sets that will provide synergy along related Pilot Projects

·       Work with Pilot Project Teams to secure funding

·       Interact with GEO participants in support of Water for the World

·       These responsibilities will include regular consultations with members of the Water for the World team, and meetings with the Water for the World team and with GEO groups pursuing relates objectives.

 

Over one billion people are without safe drinking water. Water quantities are deficient in many places and cannot support crops and feed the populace. Lack of water and food creates great hardships and dangers. Freshwater is vital for households, agriculture, and industry, and ever larger quantities will be needed for burgeoning human populations over the coming decades. Further, preservation of the world’s fresh water supply is essential for wildlife and the maintenance of biodiversity. Unfortunately, current observation and decision making systems cannot adequately monitor long-term changes and transfers in the global water system and their implications for people, the climate, and biodiversity.

The amount of freshwater available for human consumption and for ecosystem sustenance is affected by many variables. The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) will help to track these variables more effectively by filling in existing information gaps about water resources, integrating data sets from various monitoring systems, developing better forecasting models, and disseminating the results to a wider range of decision makers.

There are multiple aspects to assuring the Water For the World. These include water availability and discovery; efficient water use, water quality, energy requirements; and health.

 

Program Description

Water for the World is a three-phase program to bring water to those in the world who do not have adequate fresh water. It includes uses for personal care and health, agriculture, and industry. Water for the World is a three-phase program based on the premise that there are many easily realizable

 

Phase One is the development of an Actionable Vision. This Actionable Vision, which represents the work of a panel of internationally-recognized experts, will identify easily realizable actions that will deliver adequate clean water to much of the world. It will describe suitable Pilot Projects that will demonstrate the validity of the assertions in the Actionable Vision.

 

Phase Two of Water for the World is the execution of the Pilot Projects. At present, there are fifteen pilot projects identified. We are approaching them one by one to find funding for them.

 

Phase Three of Water for the World is Institutionalization. Embedded in each of the Pilot Project Plans is a process that will enroll the local beneficiaries in the objective and success of the Pilot Project. Each Pilot Project includes local training, integration into the local governing organizations, integration into the local social fabric, extension of the initial success to nearby areas, and then to similar areas around the world. Ultimately, our goal is an internationally accepted and supported plan to provide Water For the World, owned and directed by users and beneficiaries.

 

References:

http://www.ieee-earth.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/final-A-Blueprint-for-Water-For-the-World-November-2010.pdf

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7. Wetlands of Africa for Green and Blue Revolution

http://www.iwmi.cgiar.org/wetlands/SrilankaRuhuna.asp

 

To prioritize the use and conservation of wetlands, the team will produce multi-resolution inland valley (IV) wetland data and map products for all of West and Central Africa (WCA) encompassing 24 countries, by fusing multiple datasets. Data sources will be: (a) MODIS 250-500m Terra and Aqua continuous monthly time-series constituting mega-file data cube (MFDC) for 2001-2010; (b) Global Land Survey 2005 (GLS2005) 30m data, (c) ENVISAT ASAR after 2002 (particularly the widescan between about 100-150m), ALOS PALSAR wide-beam data (after 2006), and JERS SAR 100m, (d) Space Shuttle Topographic Mission (SRTM) 90m, and (e) a suite of secondary datasets (e.g., FAO soils, length of growing period). The outcome will enable and support decision-making that will pin-point IV wetland areas that are (1) best suited for cultivation, and (2) prioritized for conservation. The results will be communicated through in-country contacts, NGOs, Africa SERVIR, and other contacts with decision-makers via the Investigators’ African experiences.

 

Expected Outputs and Outcome: First, we will produce mosaics of all inland valley (IV) wetland data and products such as wetland maps, wetland land useland cover, and wetland time-series characteristics such as phenology and moisture variability for the entire West and Central Africa (WCA) derived using multi-sensor data fusion involving data such as MODIS, Landsat, and JERS SAR. Second, all secondary data (e.g., length of growing period, soils, slope, elevation, temperature, agroecological zones) will be harmonized, standardized and made available, also for entire WCA, so that users can use these data to create different scenarios based on different expert ranking of spatial data layers within a sub-region or a country. Third, output products showing wetlands that have various suitability ranking for: (i) cultivation and (ii) preservation will also be made available for entire WCA.

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Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security

Image of Remote Sensing of Global Croplands for Food Security

PE&RS Special Issue of Global Croplands (August, 2012; Vol. 78, No.8) Edited by Dr. Thenkabail


Contact Information

Prasad Thenkabail
2255 North Gemini Drive
Flagstaff, AZ 86001-1637
pthenkabail@usgs.gov
928-556-7221
928-556-7169 - Fax
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