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Paul Bradley

Hydrologist (RGEG)

Contact Info


Short Biography

Paul Bradley has been a research scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey since 1988. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Applied Biology from the Georgia Institute of Technology (Ga Tech). He received his Ph.D. in Physiological Ecology from the University of South Carolina in 1991. He has authored/coauthored over 160 scientific publications addressing issues of ecology and geochemistry in pristine and contaminated groundwater and surface-water systems.






1.                  Bradley, P.M. and J.H. Writer. In Press. Effect of light on biodegradation of estrone, 17β-estradiol and 17α-ethinylestradiol in stream sediment. J. American Water Resources Association.

 

2.                  Riva-Murray, K., P.M. Bradley, B.C. Scudder-Eikenberry, C.D. Knightes, C.A. Journey, M.E. Brigham, and  D.T. Button. On Line. Optimizing stream mercury sampling for calculation of fish bioaccumulation factors. Environmental Science & Technology. DOI 10.1021/es303758e

 

3.                  Golden, H.E., C.D. Knightes, P.A. Conrads, T.D. Feaster, G.M. Davis, S.T. Benedict, and P.M. Bradley. On Line. Climate change and watershed mercury export: a multiple projection and model analysis. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. DOI: 10.1002/etc.2284

 

4.                  Bradley, P.M., C.A. Journey, M.E. Brigham, D.A. Burns, D. Button, K. Riva-Murray. 2013. Intra- and inter-basin mercury comparisons: Importance of basin scale and time-weighted methylmercury estimates. Environmental Pollution. 172: 42-52. DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2012.08.008

 

5.                  Bradley, P.M. and D.W. Kolpin. 2013. Managing the impacts of endocrine disrupting chemicals in wastewater-impacted streams. Chapter 1 in P.M. Bradley Ed. Current Perspectives in Contaminant Hydrology and Water Resources Sustainability. InTech, DOI: 10.5772/47884, Pp 3-26.

 

6.                  Burns, D.A., G.R. Aiken, P.M. Bradley, and C.A. Journey. 2013. Specific Ultra-Violet Absorbance as an Indicator Measurement of Mercury Sources in an Adirondack River basin. Biogeochemistry. 113(1-3): 451-466. DOI 10.1007/s10533-012-9773-5.

 

7.                  Chapelle, F.H., P.M. Bradley, C.A. Journey, and P.B. McMahon. 2013. Assessing the relative bioavailability of DOC in regional groundwater systems. Groundwater. 51(3): 363-372. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-6584.2012.00987

 

8.                  Journey, C.A., J.L. Graham, R. Knight, J. Arrington, K. Beaulieu, and P.M. Bradley. 2013. Cyanobacteria and geosmin occurrence in two Southeastern United States drinking water reservoirs: development of explanatory model. Chapter 1 in P.M. Bradley Ed. Current Perspectives in Contaminant Hydrology and Water Resources Sustainability. InTech,, DOI: 10.5772/47884, Pp 27-55.

 

9.                  Riva-Murray, K., P.M. Bradley, L.C. Chasar, D.T. Button, M.E. Brigham, B.C. Scudder Eikenberry, C.A. Journey, M.A. Lutz. 2013. Influence of dietary carbon on mercury bioaccumulation in streams of the Adirondack Mountains of New York and the Coastal Plain of South Carolina, USA. Ecotoxicology, 22 (1): 60-71. DOI 10.1007/s10646-012-1003-3

 

10.              Bradley, P.M., M.A. Lowery, M.E. Brigham, D.A. Burns, D. Button, F.H. Chapelle, M.A. Lutz, M.C. Marvin-DiPasquale, K. Riva-Murray. C.A. Journey. 2012. Shallow groundwater methylmercury transport in a Coastal Plain Stream. Environmental Science and Technology. 46(14): 7503-7511.

 

11.              Bradley, P.M., C.A. Journey, J.S. Kirshtein, M.A. Voytek, P.J. Lacombe, T.E. Imbrigotta, F.H. Chapelle, C.J. Tiedeman, D.J. Goode. 2012. Enhanced dichloroethene biodegradation in fractured rock under biostimulated and bioaugmented conditions. Remediation Journal. 22(2):21-32.

 

12.              Bradley, P.M. 2012. Perils of categorical thinking: “Oxic/Anoxic” conceptual model in environmental remediation. Remediation Journal. 22(3): 9-18

 

13.              Bradley, P.M.  and C.A. Journey. 2012. Hydrology and methylmercury availability in Coastal Plain streams. Chapter 8 in P.C. Nayak (ed). Water Resources Management and Modeling. Intech Open Access Publisher. Pp. 169-190.

 

14.              Bradley, P.M. 2012. Microbial mineralization of cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride as a component of natural attenuation of chloroethene contaminants under conditions identified in the field as anoxic. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2012-5032. 30p.

 

15.              Beaulieu, K.M., D.T. Button, B.C. Scudder Eikenberry, K Riva-Murray, L.C. Chasar, P.M. Bradley, D.A. Burns. 2012. Mercury bioaccumulation studies in the National Water Quality Assessment Program-Biological data from New York and South Carolina, 2005-2009. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 705. 13p.

 

16.              Benedict, S.T., P.A. Conrads, T.D. Feaster, C.A. Journey, H.E. Golden, and P.M. Bradley. 2012. Data Visualization, Time-Series Analysis, and Mass-Balance Modeling of Hydrologic and Water-Quality Data for McTier Creek, South Carolina 2007–2009. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report. 2011-1209. 32p.

 

17.              Burns, D.A., K. Riva-Murray, P.M. Bradley, G.R. Aiken, M.E. Brigham. 2012. Landscape Controls on Total and Methyl Hg in the upper Hudson River basin, New York, USA. J. Geophysical Research.117: Pp 15. G01034, doi:10.1029/2011JG001812.

 

18.              Chapelle, F.H., P.M. Bradley, P.J. Lacombe. 2012. Estimated trichloroethene transformation rates due to naturally occurring biodegradation in a fractured-rock aquifer. Remediation Journal. 22(2):7-20.

 

19.              Chapelle, F.H., P.M. Bradley, P.B. McMahon, K. Kaiser, and R. Benner. 2012. Dissolved Oxygen as an Indicator of Bioavailable Dissolved Organic Carbon in Groundwater. Groundwater. 50(2):230-241.

 

20.              Chapelle, F.H., L.K. Thomas, P.M. Bradley, H.V. Rectanus, and M.A. Widdowson. 2012. Threshold amounts of organic carbon  needed to initiate reductive dechlorination in ground-water systems. Remediation Journal. 22(3): 19-28.

 

21.              Feaster, T.D., N.E. Westcott, R.J.M. Hudson. P.C. Conrads, and P.M. Bradley. 2012. Comparison of NEXRAD-based and Observed Rainfall Data Inputs and TOPMODEL Simulations in the McTier Creek Watershed, South Carolina. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report. 2012-5120. 33p.

 

22.              Golden, H.E., C.D. Knightes, P.A. Conrads, G.M. Davis, T.D. Feaster, C.A. Journey, S.T. Benedict, M.E. Brigham, P.M. Bradley. 2012. Characterizing mercury concentrations and fluxes in a Coastal Plain watershed: Insights from dynamic modeling and data. J. Geophysical Research. 117: Pp 17. G01006, doi:10.1029/2011JG001806.

 

23.              Journey, C.A., D.A. Burns, K. Riva-Murray. M.E. Brigham, D.T. Button, T.D. Feaster, M.D. Pekewich, and P.M. Bradley. 2012. Fluvial transport of mercury, organic carbon, suspended sediment, and selected major ions in contrasting stream basins in South Carolina and New York: October 2004-September 2009. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report. 2012-5173. 125p.

 

24.              McMahon, P.B., F.H. Chapelle, P.M.Bradley. 2012. Evolution of Redox Processes in Groundwater. Chapter 26 in P.G. Tratnyek, T.J. Grundal, S. Haderlein, Eds. Aquatic Redox Chemistry. ACS Symposium Series, American Chemical Society. Washington, D.C.. Pp.581-597.

 

25.              Scudder Eikenberry, B.C., K. Riva-Murray, M.J. Smith, P.M. Bradley, D.T. Button, J.M. Clark, D.A. Burns., and C.A. Journey. 2012. Environmental settings of selected streams sampled for mercury in New York and South Carolina, 2005–09: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2011–1318, 36 p.

 

26.              Bradley, P.M., D.A. Burns, K. Riva-Murray, M.E. Brigham, D. Button, L. Chasar, M. Marvin-DiPasquale, M. A. Lowery, and C.A. Journey. 2011. Spatial and seasonal variability of dissolved methylmercury in two stream basins in the eastern United States. Environmental Science and Technology. 45(6): 2048-2055.

 

27.              Bradley, P.M. 2011. Reinterpreting the importance of oxygen-based biodegradation in chloroethene-contaminated groundwater. Groundwater Monitoring & Remediation. 31(4): 50-55.

 

28.              Bradley, P.M., and F.H. Chapelle. 2011. Microbial mineralization of dichloroethene and vinyl chloride under hypoxic conditions. Groundwater Monitoring & Remediation. 31(4): 39-49.

 

29.              Journey, C.A., A.W. Caldwell, T.D. Feaster, M.D. Petkewich, and P.M. Bradley. 2011. Concentrations, Loads, and Yields of Nutrients and Suspended Sediment in the South Pacolet, North Pacolet, and Pacolet Rivers, Northern South Carolina and Southwestern North Carolina, October 2005 to September 2009. USGS Scientific Investigations Report. 2010-5252, 79 p.

 

30.              Journey, C.A., J.M. Arrington, K.M. Beaulieu, J.L. Graham, P.M. Bradley. 2011. Limnological conditions and occurrence of taste-and-odor compounds in Lake William C. Bown and Municipal Reservoir #1, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, 2006-2009. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report. 2011-5060. 30p.

 

31.              Riva-Murray, K., L.C. Chasar, P.M. Bradley, D.A. Burns, M.E. Brigham, M.J. Smith and T.A. Abrahamsen. 2011. Spatial patterns of mercury in macroinvertebrates and fishes from streams of two contrasting forested landscapes in the eastern United States. Ecotoxicology. 20(7):1530-1542.

 

32.              Thomas, L.K., C.A. Journey, W.J. Stringfield, J.M. Clark, P.M. Bradley, J.B. Wellborn, W.H. Ratliff, and T.A. Abrahamsen. 2011. Trace element, semivolatile organic, and chlorinated organic compound concentrations in bed sediments of selected streams at Fort Gordon, Georgia, February–April 2010: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2011–1067, 53 p.

 

33.              Writer, J.H., L.B. Barber, J. Ryan, and P.M. Bradley. 2011. Biodegradation and Attenuation of Steroidal Hormones and Alkylphenols by Stream Biofilms and Sediments. Environmental Science and Technology. 45(10): 4370-4376.

 

34.              Bradley, P.M., C.A. Journey, P. A. Conrads, F.H. Chapelle, and M.A. Lowery. 2010. Flood hydrology and methylmercury availability in Coastal Plain rivers. Environmental Science and Technology. 44(24): 9285-9290.

 

35.              Bradley, P.M., and F.H. Chapelle. 2010. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Ethenes. Chapter 3 in H.F. Stroo and C.H. Ward, Eds. In Situ Remediation of Chlorinated Solvent Plumes. Springer. New York. p. 39-67.

 

36.              Feaster, T.D., H.E. Golden, K.R. Odom, M.A. Lowery, P.A. Conrads, and P.M. Bradley. 2010. Simulation of the quantity, variability, and timing of Streamflow in the McTier Creek Basin, South Carolina. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2011-5202. 61p.

 

37.              He, Y., C. Su, J. Wilson, R. Wilkin, C. Adair, T. Lee, P. Bradley, and M. Ferrey. 2010. Identification and characterization methods for reactive minerals responsible for natural attenuation of chlorinated organic compounds in ground water. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. EPA 600/R-09/115. 152p.

 

38.              Landmeyer, J.E., P.M. Bradley, D.A. Trego, K.G. Hale, and J.E. Haas, II. 2010. MTBE, TBA, and TAME attenuation in diverse hyporheic zones. Ground Water. 48(1): 30-41.

 

39.              Woodruff, L.G., W.F. Cannon, C.D. Knightes, F.H. Chapelle, P.M. Bradley, D.A. Burns, M.E. Brigham, and M.A. Lowery. 2010. Total mercury, methylmercury, and selected elements in soils of the Fishing Brook Watershed, Aiken County, South Carolina, 2008. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 516, 18p.

 

40.              Bradley, P.M., L.B. Barber, F.H Chapelle, J.L Gray, D.W. Kolpin, and P.B. McMahon. 2009. Biodegradation of 17β-estradiol, estrone, and testosterone in stream sediments. Environmental Science & Technology. 43(6): 1902-1910.

 

41.              Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, and C.A. Journey. 2009. Comparison of methylmercury production and accumulation in sediments of the Congaree and Edisto River Basins, South Carolina, 2004-2006. USGS Scientific Investigations Report. 2009-5021, 9p.

 

42.              Bradley, P.M. 2009. Potential for microbial degradation of cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride in streambed sediment at the U.S. Department of Energy, Kansas City Plant, Missouri, 2008. USGS Scientific Investigations Report. 2009-5137, 12p.

 

43.              Bradley, P.M. 2009. Potential for biodegradation of contaminants of emerging concern in stream systems. Proceedings of the 2009 South Carolina Environmental Conference.

 

44.              Bradley, P.M., P. Lacombe, T. Imbrigiotta, F.H. Chapelle, and D.J. Goode. 2009. Flowpath-independent monitoring of reductive dechlorination in a fracture rock aquifer. Groundwater Monitoring and Remediation. 29(4): 46-55.

 

45.              Chapelle, F.H., P.M. Bradley, D.J. Goode, C. Tiedeman, P.J. Lacombe, K. Kaiser, and R. Benner. 2009. Biochemical indicators for the bioavailability of organic carbon in ground water. Ground Water. 47(1): 108-121.

 

46.              Chapelle, F.H., P.M. Bradley, M.A. Thomas, and P.B. McMahon. 2009. Distinguishing iron-reducing from sulfate-reducing conditions. Ground Water. 47(2): 300-305.

 

47.              Chapelle, F.H., P.M. Bradley, P.B. McMahon, and B.D. Lindsey. 2009. What does “Water Quality” mean? Ground Water. 47(6): 752-754.

 

48.              Barber, L.B., M.T. Meyer, D.R. LeBlanc, D.W. Kolpin, P.M. Bradley, F.H. Chapelle, and F. Rubio. 2009. Subsurface fate and transport of 4-Nonylphenol, 17β-Estradiol, and sulfamethoxazole. Environmental Science and Technology. 43(13): 4843-4850.

 

49.              Vroblesky, D.A., J.L. Canova, P.M. Bradley, and J.E. Landmeyer. 2009. Tritium concentrations in environmental samples and transpiration rates from the vicinity of Mary’s Branch Creek and background areas, Barnwell, South Carolina, 2007-2009. USGS Scientific Investigations Report. 2009-5245, 12 p.

 

50.              Bradley, P.M., L.B. Barber, D.W. Kolpin, P.B. McMahon, and F.H. Chapelle. 2008. Potential for 4-n-nonylphenol biodegradation in stream sediments. Environmnetal Toxicology & Chemistry. 28(2): 260-265.

 

51.              Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, and F.E. Löffler. 2008. Anoxic mineralization: Environmental reality or experimental artifact? Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation. 28(1): 47-49.

 

52.              Bradley, P.M. 2008. Potential for biodegradation of contaminants of emerging concern in streams systems. Proceedings of the 2008 South Carolina Water Resources Conference.

 

53.              Bradley, P.M. 2007. Dichloroethene and vinyl chloride degradation potential in wetland sediments at Twin Lakes and Pen Branch, Savannah River National Laboratory, South Carolina. U.S. Geological Survey Open File Report 2007-1028, 21p.

 

54.              Bradley, P.M., L.B. Barber, D.W. Kolpin, P.B. McMahon, and F.H. Chapelle. 2007. Biotransformation of caffeine, cotinine, and nicotine in stream sediments: implications for use as waste-water indicators. Environmnetal Toxicology & Chemistry. 26(6): 1116-1121.

 

55.              Bradley, P.M., and F.H. Chapelle. 2007. Accumulation of dechlorination daughter products: A valid metric of chloroethene biodegradation? Remediation Journal. 17(4): 7-22.

 

56.              Bradley, P.M., M.A. Singletary, and F.H. Chapelle. 2007. Chloroethene dechlorination in acidic groundwater: Implications for combining Fenton’s Treatment with natural attenuation. Remediation Journal. 18(1): 7-19.

 

57.              Barber, L.B., M.T. Meyer, D.R. LeBlanc, D.W. Kolpin, P.M. Bradley, F.H. Chapelle, and F. Rubio. 2007. Subsurface fate and transport of sulfamethoxazole, 4-nonylphenol, and 17β-estradiol. 2008, in Trefry, M.G., ed., Groundwater Quality 2007--Securing Groundwater Quality in Urban and Industrial Environments: International Association of Hydrological Sciences IAHS Redbook, IAHS Publ. 324, p. 133-139.

 

58.              Chapelle, F.H., and P.M. Bradley. 2007. Hydrologic significance of carbon monoxide concentrations in ground water. Ground Water. 45(3): 272-280.

 

59.              Vroblesky, D.A., F.H. Chapelle, and P.M. Bradley. 2007. A simple pore-water hydrogen diffusion syringe sampler. Ground Water. 45(6): 798-802.

 

60.              Bradley, P.M., and J.E. Landmeyer. 2006. Low-temperature MTBE biodegradation in aquifer sediments with a history of low, seasonal groundwater temperatures. Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation. 26(1): 101-105.

 

61.              Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, and J.E. Landmeyer. 2006. Effect of H2 and redox conditions on biotic and abiotic MTBE transformation. Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation. 26(4): 74-81.

 

62.              Bradley, P.M., and R.S. Dinicola. 2005. RDX biodegradation in aquifer sediments under manganese-reducing conditions. Bioremediation Journal. 9(1): 1-8.

 

63.              Bradley, P.M., S.A. Carr, R. Baird, and F.H. Chapelle. 2005. Biodegradation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine in soil from a water reclamation facility. Bioremediation Journal. 9(2):115-120.

 

64.              Bradley, P.M., S. Richmond, and F.H. Chapelle. 2005. Chloroethene biodegradation in sediments at 4 C. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 71(10): 6414-6417.

 

65.              Chapelle, F.H., P.M. Bradley, and C.C. Casey. 2005. Behavior of a chlorinated ethene plume following source-area treatment with Fenton’s Reagent. Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation. 25(2): 131-141.

 

66.              Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 2004. Chloroethene biodegradation potential, ADOT/PF Peger Road Maintenance Facility, Fairbanks, Alaska. USGS Open-File Report 2004-1428.

 

67.              Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 2004. Chloroethene biodegradation potential in the lower contaminant plume, River Terrace RV Park, Soldotna, Alaska. USGS Open-File Report 2004-1427.

 

68.              Vroblesky, D.A., B.D. Clinton, J.M. Vose, C.C. Casey, G.J.Harvey, and P.M. Bradley. 2004. Ground water chlorinated ethenes in tree trunks: case studies, influence of rechargee, and potential degradation mechanism. Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation. 24(3): 124-138.

 

69.              Bradley, P.M. 2003. History and ecology of chloroethene biodegradation: A review. Bioremediation Journal. 7(2): 81-109.

 

70.              Landmeyer, J.E., Bradley, P.M., and Bullen, T.D. 2003. Stable lead isotopes reveal a natural source of high lead concentrations to gasoline-contaminated ground water. Environmental Geology 45: 12-22.

 

71.              Landmeyer, J.E. and P.M. Bradley. 2003. Effect of hydrologic and geochemical conditions on oxygen-enhanced bioremediation in a gasoline-contaminated aquifer. Bioremediation Journal. 7(3-4): 165-177.

 

72.              Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 2002. Microbial mineralization of ethene under sulfate-reducing conditions. Bioremediation Journal. 6: 1-8.

 

73.              Bradley, P.M., J.E. Landmeyer and F.H. Chapelle. 2002. TBA biodegradation in surface-water sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.  Environmental Science and Technology. 36: 4087-4090.

 

74.              Chapelle, F.H., K. O’Neill, P.M. Bradley, B.A. Methe, S.A. Ciufo, L.L. Knobel and D.R. Lovley. 2002. A hydrogen-based subsurface microbial community dominated by methanogens. Nature. 415: 312-315.

 

75.              Chapelle, F.H., P.M. Bradley, D.R. Lovley, K. O’Neill and J.E. Landmeyer. 2002. Rapid evolution of redox processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. Ground Water. 40: 353-360.

 


76.              Bradley, P.M., J.E. Landmeyer and F.H. Chapelle. 2001. Widespread potential for microbial MTBE degradation in surface water sediments. Environmental Science and Technology. 35: 658-662.

 

77.              Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle and J.E. Landmeyer. 2001. Methy t-butyl ether mineralization in surface-water-sediment microcosms under denitrifying conditions. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 67: 1975-1978.

 

78.              Landmeyer, J.E., F.H. Chapelle, H.H. Herlong and P.M. Bradley. 2001. Methyl tert‑butyl ether biodegradation by indigenous aquifer microorganisms under

79.              natural and artificial oxic conditions. Environmental Science and Technology. 35: 1118-1126.

 

80.              Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle and J.E. Landmeyer. 2001. Effect of redox conditions on MTBE biodegradation in surface water sediments. Environmental Science and Technology. 35: 4643-4647.

 

81.              Vroblesky, D.A., P.M. Bradley, M.D. Petkewich and C.C. Casey. 2001. Biodegradation potential of chlorinated solvents in ground water at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Louisville, Kentucky, July 1999 to February 2000. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigation Report 01-4242. 22p.

 

82.              Bradley, P.M. 2000. Microbial degradation of chloroethenes in ground water systems. Hydrogeology Journal. 8: 104-111.

 

83.              Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 2000. Aerobic microbial mineralization of dichloroethene as sole carbon substrate. Environmental Science and Technology. 34: 221-223.

 

84.              Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 2000. Acetogenic microbial degradation of vinyl chloride. Environmental Science and Technology. 34: 2761-2763.

 

85.              Bradley, P.M., R.S. Dinicola and J.E. Landmeyer. 2000. Natural attenuation of 1,2-dichloroethane by aquifer microorganisms under Mn(IV)-reducing conditions. Pp. 169-174. In Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds: Natural Attenuation Considerations and Case Studies. G.B. Wickramanayake, A.R. Gavaskar, and M.E. Kelley (Eds). Battelle Press. Columbus.

 

86.              Chapelle, F. H., J. F. Robertson, J. E. Landmeyer and P. M. Bradley. 2000. Methodology for applying monitored natural attenuation to petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground-water systems with examples from South Carolina. U. S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 00-4161. 47pp.

 

87.              Dinicola, R.S., S.E. Cox and P.M. Bradley. 2000. Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in ground water at Area 6, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington. . U. S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 00-4060. 86pp.

 

88.              Landmeyer, J.E., F.H. Chapelle and P.M. Bradley. 2000. Microbial H2 cycling does not affect δ2H values of ground water. Ground Water. 38:376-380.

 

89.              Landmeyer, J.E., P.M. Bradley and J.M. Thomas. 2000. Biodegradation of disinfection byproducts as a potential removal process during aquifer storage recovery. Journal of the American Water Resources Association. 36:861-867

 

90.              Landmeyer, J.E., D.A. Vroblesky and P.M.Bradley. 2000. MTBE and BTEX in trees above gasoline-contaminated ground water.Pp. 17-24. In Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds: Case Studies in the Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. G.B. Wickramanayake, A.R. Gavaskar, J.T. Gibbs and J.L.Means (Eds). Battelle Press. Columbus.

 

91.              Thomas, J.M., W.A. McKay, E. Cole, J.E. Landmeyer and P.M. Bradley. 2000. The fate of haloacetic acids and trihalomethanes in an aquifer storage and recovery project Las Vegas, Nevada. Ground Water. 38: 605-614.

 

92.              Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 1999. Methane as a product of chloroethene biodegradation under methanogenic conditions. Environmental Science and Technology. 33:653-656.

 

93.              Bradley, P. M. and F.H. Chapelle. 1999. Response to comment on Methane as a product of chloroethene biodegradation under methanogenic conditions@. Environmental Science and Technology. 33:2304.

 

94.              Bradley, P.M., J. E. Landmeyer, and F.H. Chapelle. 1999. Aerobic mineralization of MTBE and t-butyl alcohol by stream-bed-sediment microorganisms. Environmental Science and Technology. 33:1877-1879.

 

95.              Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 1999. Role for acetotrophic methanogens in methanogenic biodegradation of vinyl chloride. Environmental Science and Technology. 33: 3473-3476.

 

96.              Bradley, P.M., J.E. Landmeyer, and F.H. Chapelle. 1999. Mineralization of MTBE and tert-butanol by stream-bed sediment microorganisms. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program. 3:87-92.

 

97.              Chapelle, F.H. and P.M.Bradley. 1999. Assessing the natural attenuation capacity of ground-water systems. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program. 3:7-20.

 

98.              Landmeyer, J.E., P.M. Bradley and F.H. Chapelle. 1999. Fate of MTBE relative to benzene in a gasoline-contaminated aquifer (1993-98). Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program. 3:59-74.

 

99.              Morris, J.T. and P.M. Bradley. 1999. Effects of nutrient loading on the carbon balance of coastal wetland sediments. Limnology and Oceanography. 44:699-702.

 

100.          Vroblesky, D.A., P.M.Bradley, J.W. Lane and J.F. Robertson. 1999. Microbial processes and down-hole mesocosms in two anaerobic fractured-rock aquifers. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program. 3:695-704.

 

101.          Vroblesky, D.A., M.D. Petkewich, P.M. Bradley and J.F. Robertson. 1999. Natural attenuation assessment of contaminated ground water at a gas-turbine manufacturing plant, Greenville, South Carolina. USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 98-4163.


 

102.          Vroblesky, D.A., C.T. Nietch, J.F. Robertson, P.M. Bradley, J. Coates and J.T. Morris. 1999. Natural attenuation potential of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in ground water, TNX flood plain, Savannah River Site, South Carolina. USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4071.

 

103.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, and J.T. Wilson. 1998. Field and laboratory evidence for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in a Fe(III)-reducing aquifer. Contaminant Hydrology. 31:111-127.

 

104.          Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 1998. Effect of contaminant concentration on aerobic microbial mineralization of DCE and VC in stream-bed sediments. Environmental Science and Technology. 32:553-557.

 

105.          Bradley, P.M., J.E. Landmeyer, and R.S. Dinicola. 1998. Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C] DCE under Mn(IV) reducing conditions. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 64:1560-1562.

 

106.          Bradley, P.M. and F. H. Chapelle. 1998. Microbial mineralization of VC andDCE under different terminal electron accepting conditions. Anaerobe. 4:81-87.

 

107.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, and D.R. Lovley. 1998. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethene. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 64:3102-3105.

 

108.          Chapelle, F.H. and P.M. Bradley. 1998. Selecting remediation goals by assessing the natural attenuation capacity of ground-water systems. Bioremediation Journal. 2:227-238.

 

109.          Landmeyer, J.E., F.H. Chapelle, M.D. Petkewich, and P.M. Bradley. 1998. Assessment of natural attenuation of aromatic hydrocarbons in ground water near a former manufactured-gas plant, South Carolina, USA. Environmental Geology. 34:279-292.

 

110.          Landmeyer, J.E. and P.M. Bradley. 1998. Hydrologic and water-chemistry data from the Cretaceous-aquifers test well (BFT-2055), Beaufort County, South Carolina. Southeastern Geology. 37:141-148.


 

111.          Landmeyer, J.E., F.H. Chapelle, P.M. Bradley, J.F. Pankow, C.D. Church, and P.G. Tratnyek. 1998. Fate of MTBE relative to benzene in a gasoline-contaminated aquifer (1993-1998). Groundwater Monitoring and Remediation. 18:93-102.

 

112.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, J.E. Landmeyer, and J.G. Schumacher. 1997. Potential for intrinsic bioremediation of a DNT-contaminated aquifer. Ground Water. 35:12-17.

 

113.          Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 1997. Kinetics of DCE and VC mineralization under methanogenic and Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Environmental Science and Technology. 31:2692-2697.

 

114.          Chapelle, F.H. and P.M. Bradley. 1997. Alteration of aquifer geochemistry by microorganisms. Chapter 61 in C.J. Hurst et al. (eds.) Manual of Environmental Microbiology. pp. 558-564.

 

115.          Petkewich, M.D., D.A. Vroblesky, J.F. Robertson, and P.M. Bradley. 1997. Water-quality, water level, and lake-bottom-sediment data collected from the defense fuel supply point and adjacent properties, Hanahan, South Carolina. USGS Open File Report 96-488.

 

116.          Vroblesky, D.A., P.M. Bradley, and F.H. Chapelle. 1997. Lack of correlation between organic acid concentrations and predominant electron-accepting processes in a contaminated aquifer. Environmental Science and Technology. 31:1416-1418.

 


117.          Vroblesky, D.A., J.F. Robertson, M.D. Petkewich, F.H. Chapelle, P.M. Bradley, and J.E. Landmeyer. 1997. Remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water in the vicinity of a jet-fuel tank farm, Hanahan, South Carolina. USGS Water-Resources Investigation Report 96-4251.

 

118.          Vroblesky, D.A., P.M. Bradley, J.W. Lane, and J.F. Robertson. 1997. Transport and transformation of chlorinated-solvent contamination in a saprolite and fractured rock aquifer near a former wastewater-treatment plant, Greenville, South Carolina. USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 97-4003.

 

119.          Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 1996. Anaerobic mineralization of vinyl chloride in Fe(III)-Reducing, aquifer sediments. Environmental Science and Technology. 30:2084-2086.

 

120.          Chapelle, F.H., J.E. Landmeyer, and P.M. Bradley. 1996. Assessment of intrinsic bioremediation of jet fuel contamination in a shallow aquifer, Beaufort, South Carolina. U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Investigations Report. 95-4262. p. 30.

 


121.          Chapelle, F.H., P.M. Bradley, D. R. Lovley, and D.A. Vroblesky. 1996. Measuring rates of biodegradation in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. Ground Water. 34:691-698.

 

122.          Chapelle, F.H., S.K. Haack, P. Adriaens, M.A. Henry, and P.M. Bradley. 1996. Comparison of Eh and H2 measurements for delineating redox zonation in a contaminated aquifer. Environmental Science and Technology. 30:3565-3569.

 

123.          Chapelle, F.H. and P.M. Bradley. 1996. Microbial acetogensis as a source of organic acids in ancient Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments. Geology. 24:925-928.

 

124.          Landmeyer, J.E., F.H. Chapelle, and P.M. Bradley. 1996. Evaluation of passive bioremediation as an option for remediating gasoline contamination, Laurel Bay Exchange, Marine Corps Air Station, Beaufort, South Carolina. U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Investigations Report. 96-4026. p. 50.

 

125.          Vroblesky, D.A., P.M. Bradley, and F.H. Chapelle. 1996. Influence of electron donor on the minimum sulfate concentration required for sulfate reduction in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. Environmental Science and Technology. 30:1377-1381.

 

126.          Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 1995. Factors affecting microbial TNT mineralization in contaminated soil. Environmental Science and Technology.29:802-806.

 

127.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, and P.B. McMahon. 1995. Nitrate and carbon limitation of denitrification in bed sediments from a waste-effluent-contaminated stream. Water Resources Research.31:1063-1068.

 

128.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle. 1995. Rapid Toluene Mineralization by Aquifer Microorganisms at Adak, Alaska: Implications for Intrinsic Bioremediation in Cold Environments. Environmental Science and Technology. 29:2778-2881.

 

129.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, and J.E. Landmeyer. 1995. Degradation of 2,4-DNT, 2,6-DNT and 2,4,6-TNT by indigenous aquifer microorganisms. pp 267-272. In Bioremediation of Recalcitrant Organics. R.E. Hinchee, D. B. Anderson, and R. E. Hoeppel (Eds). Battelle Press. Columbus.

 

130.          McMahon, P.B., D.A. Vroblesky, P.M. Bradley, F.H. Chapelle, and C.D. Gullet. 1995. Evidence for enhanced mineral dissolution in organic acid-rich shallow ground water.  Ground Water. 33:207-216.

 

131.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, P.B. McMahon, and M. Jagucki.  1994. Influence of atrazine on potential denitrification in saturated sediments.  Soil Biology and Biochemistry. 26(4):523-524.

 

132.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, and D.A. Vroblesky. 1994. Effects of Pb and terminal-electron-accepting processes on organic acid concentrations in contaminated aquifer sediments. Proceedings US Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program. pp. 865-872.

 

133.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, and D.A. Vroblesky. 1994. Does lead affect microbial metabolism in aquifer sediments under different terminal electron accepting conditions? Geomicrobiology. 11:85-94.

 

134.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, J.E. Landmeyer, and J.G. Schumacher. 1994. Microbial transformation of nitroaromatics in surface soils and aquifer sediments.  Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 60(6)2170-2175.

 

135.          Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 1994. Microbial ecology of TNT and DNT in contaminated soils and aquifer materials at Weldon Spring, Missouri. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Ground Water Ecology. Atlanta, Georgia, March 27-30.

 


136.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle, and J.E. Landmeyer. 1994. Microbial degradation of nitroaromatic contaminants in aquifers and surface soils. Proceedings of the 18th Annual Army Environmental Research and Development Symposium. Williamsburg, Virginia, June 28-30.

 

137.          Chapelle, F.H. and P.M. Bradley. 1994. Microbial degradation of nitrotoluenes in surface soils and aquifer sediments, Weldon Spring, Missouri. Proceedings US Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program. pp. 889-895.

 

138.          Landmeyer, J.E., F.H. Chapelle and P.M. Bradley. 1994. Microbial activity in saprolite: a possible mechanism for saprolite formation in the piedmont. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Ground Water Ecology. Atlanta, Georgia, March 27-30.

 

139.          Chapelle, F.H., P.M. Bradley, and P.B. McMahon. 1993. Chapter 8. Subsurface Microbiology. pp. 181-198 in W.M. Alley (ed.) Regional Ground-Water Quality. Springer-Verlag, New York.

 

140.          Bradley, P.M. and F.H. Chapelle. 1993. Arsenate inhibition of denitrification in nitrate contaminated sediments. Soil Biology and Biochemistry. 25(10):1459-1462.

 

141.          Landmeyer, J.E., P.M. Bradley, and F.H. Chapelle. 1993. Influence of lead on microbial activity in lead-contaminated and -uncontaminated sediments. Soil Biology and Biochemistry. 25(10):1465-1466.

 

142.          Chapelle, F.H., P.M. Bradley, and J.E. Landmeyer. 1993. Corrective action plan, naval exchange service station, Naval Air Station, Memphis, Millington, Tennessee. US Geological Survey Water Resources Investigation Report.

 

143.          Fernandez, M., P.M. Bradley, and J.P. Spears. 1993. Investigation of the source and extent of high nitrate concentrations near the senior officers' housing area, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida. US Geological Survey Water Resources Investigation Report.

 

144.          McMahon, P.B., F.H. Chapelle, W.F. Falls, and P.M. Bradley. 1992. Role of microbial processes in linking sandstone diagenesis with organic-rich clays. Journal of Sediment Petrology. 62(1):1-10.

 

145.          Bradley, P.M. and J.T. Morris. 1992. Nitrogen limitation of growth and the effect of salinity on the critical nitrogen content of Spartina alterniflora Loisel. Aquatic Botany. 43:149-161.

 

146.          Bradley, P.M., C.M. Aelion and D.A. Vroblesky. 1992. Influence of environmental factors on denitrification in sediment contaminated with JP‑4 jet fuel. Ground Water. 30(6):843-848.

 


147.          Bradley, P.M., F.H. Chapelle and M. Fernandez. 1992. Carbon limitation of denitrification in an anaerobic ground water system: implications for application rates of nitrogen fertilizer. Environmental Science and Technology. 26(12):2377-2381.

 

148.          Bradley, P.M. and J.T. Morris. 1991. Influence of salinity on the kinetics of NH4+ uptake in Spartina alterniflora. Oecologia. 85:375-380.

 

149.          Aelion, C.M. and P.M. Bradley. 1991. Aerobic biodegradation potential of subsurface microorganisms from a jet fuel contaminated aquifer. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 57(1):57-63.

 

150.          Bradley, P.M. 1991. DISSERTATION: Effects of Edaphic Factors on the Physiological Ecology of the Salt Marsh Cord Grass, Spartina alterniflora Loisel. University of South Carolina. Marine Science Program. 200 p.

 

151.          Bradley, P.M. and J.T. Morris. 1991. The relative importance of ion exclusion, secretion and accumulation in Spartina alterniflora Loisel. Journal of Experimental Botany. 42(245):1525-1532.

 

152.          Bradley, P.M. and J.T. Morris. 1990. Influence of oxygen and sulfide concentration on nitrogen uptake kinetics in Spartina alterniflora. Ecology 71(1):282-287.

 

153.          Bradley, P.M. and J.T. Morris. 1990. Physical characteristics of salt marsh sediments: ecological implications. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 61:245-252.

 

154.          Bradley, P.M., B. Kjerfve and J.T. Morris. 1990. Rediversion salinity change in Cooper River, South Carolina: ecological implications. Estuaries. 13(4):373-379.

 

155.          Bradley, P.M. and E.L. Dunn. 1989. Effects of sulfide on the growth of three salt marsh halophytes of the southeastern United States. American Journal of Botany 76(12):1707-1713.

 

156.          Bradley, P.M. 1987. THESIS: Effects of Sulfide on Growth and Metabolic Responses of Salt Marsh Halophytes of the Southeastern United States. Georgia Institute of Technology. School of Applied Biology. 116 p.




                           

My Science Topics


Science Topic
Subtopic
Environmental Issuescontamination and pollution
Environmental Issuesnonpoint-source pollution
Environmental Issuespesticides and herbicides
Environmental Issuespharmaceuticals
Environmental Issuessurface water quality
Environmental Issueswater quality
Ecology and Environmentaquatic ecosystems
Ecology and Environmentecological processes
Ecology and Environmentenvironmental assessment
Ecology and Environmentfreshwater ecosystems
Ecology and Environmentwetlands
Ecology and Environmentbenthic ecosystems
Ecology and Environmentecosystem functions



My USGS Science Strategy Areas

Understanding Ecosystems & Predicting Ecosystems Change

The Role of Environment and Wildlife in Human Health

Image of Current Focus for

TOXIC SUBSTANCES HYDROLOGY PROGRAM

EMERGING CONTAMINANTS PROJECT - National Research Team assessing sources, fate & transport, and ecological impacts of contaminants of emerging concern (CEC) in the environment. Personal research focus is on CEC biodegradation and the potential for utilizing the environment’s intrinsic assimilative capacity to manage CEC environmental risk.

MERCURY IN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS-Research on sources, fate & transport, and ecological impacts of mercury in the environment. 


NATIONAL WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

REGIONAL STREAM QUALITY ASSESSMENT PROJECTNational Research Team assessing watershed-scale and reach-scale drivers of water quality and ecological integrity in perennial streams in multiple regions of the US, in order to evaluate the relative impacts of individual stressors and stressor groups on aquatic community health. Personal research focus is on surface-water contaminant biogeochemistry and ecological impacts of CEC, pesticides, and mercury.



Additional Links

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Google Citations, South Carolina Water Science Center


Contact Information

Paul Bradley
720 Gracern Road
Columbia, SC 29210-0000
pbradley@usgs.gov
803-750-6125
803-750-6181 - Fax
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