USGS - science for a changing world

USGS Professional Pages

Blank space
Search USGS Professionals Featured Profiles Blank space Frequently Asked Questions  |  About The USGS Professional Pages

Lesleigh Anderson

Research Geologist

Contact Info


Short Biography

Lesleigh Anderson is a Research Geologist based in Denver, Colorado with the Geoscience and Environmental Change Science Center.  She received her BS degree in chemistry from the University of Utah, and her MS and PhD in Geosciences from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.  Her research activities focus on investigating paleoclimate in arctic and alpine regions using geochemical and sedimentary climate-proxies in lake sediments.  Lesleigh's current research is on past climate variability and patterns of western North America with an emphasis on water.  She develops records with decade-to-century resolution that extend from the present to ~10,000 years ago that provide a context for recent hydroclimatic trends and extremes and provide a better understanding of the mechanisms that cause climate change.



Read Full Professional Summary

Publications

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1






                           

My Science Topics


Science Topic
Subtopic
Water Resourcesdroughts
Water Resourceslakes
Earth Characteristicssnow and ice cover
Environmental Issuesland use change
Hydrologic Processeswater cycle
Geologic Processesgeochemistry
Natural Resourceswater resources
Techniques and Methodsisotopic analysis



My USGS Science Strategy Areas

Climate Variability & Change

Holocene Hydroclimate of Western North America

Synopsis of Research

This research aims to characterize past and ongoing climate change in Western North America using stable isotopes of water as tracers of atmospheric and hydrologic processes with a focus on development of isotope records from lake sediments .  Paleoclimate archives are the best available data to document shifts in long-term (> 30-yr) averages and Holocene records from western North America indicate that decadal-to-centennial climate variability is a more prominent feature than is recognized from the instrumental record. Holocene records provide insights into how external influences (i.e., duration of seasons, solar intensity, volcanic activity) and internal mechanisms such as ENSO will compound or counteract the climatic effects of human-induced increases in atmospheric CO2. Thus, characterizing decadal-to-centennial climate variations in Western North America in the past is critical to understanding how the region could evolve in the future.


Recent Results

 

To identify the existence and cause of recent lake area changes in the Yukon Flats, a region of discontinuous permafrost in north central Alaska, this study evaluated remotely sensed imagery with lake water isotope compositions and hydroclimatic parameters. Evaluation of the collected data revealed not only the source water of the lakes, but also evaporation rates and rates of water inflow. The findings indicate that most of these lakes were near their maximum extent in the early 1980s during a relatively cool and wet period. Subsequent reductions can be explained by moisture deficits and greater evaporation.


Contact Information

Lesleigh Anderson
West 6th Ave. & Kipling St., DFC Bldg. 25
Lakewood, CO 80225-0046
land@usgs.gov
303-236-1296
303-236-5349 - Fax
Back to top

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: https://profile.usgs.gov/professional/mypage.php
Page Contact Information:Ask USGS
Page Last Modified: January 24 2013 17:21:51.
Version: 2.6