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Noel Burkhead

Research Fish Biologist

Contact Info


Short Biography

EDUCATION:

      Roanoke College, B.S. (major general biology), 1973

      University of Tennessee, M.S. (major zoology), 1980

 

TECHNICAL TRAINING RECEIVED:

      Two courses in statistics, 8 credits, Graduate School, University of Florida, 1993-1994

      CPR and Firs Aide (current certifications held from 1989 to 1997; 2009

      DAN Emergency Oxygen Administration 1994 & 1996

      NAUI Dry Suite Training 1994

      Supervisor I Training 1996

      Personnel Training for Supervisors 1997

      DOI Boating Safety 1997

      USGS Lotus Notes software training 1999

      AIMS Training (December 2000)

     Federal Information Systems Security Awareness Training 2003 to 2011

      Charge Card Holder Travel and Purchase Training 2004

      DOI Safety Training 2005

      Discrimination and Whistle-blowing in the Workplace 2007 to 2011

      Privacy Act Orientation 2008 to 2011

      Records Management Awareness 2006 to 2011

      DOI Safe Driver Training 2011

 

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

 

PRESENT ASSIGNMENTS

 

Fisheries Research Biologist, Southeast Ecological Science Center

Dates:  from 2010 to present (2005 to 2010, ex Florida Integrated Science Center)

 



EDUCATION:

      Roanoke College, B.S. (major general biology), 1973

      University of Tennessee, M.S. (major zoology), 1980

 

TECHNICAL TRAINING RECEIVED:

      Two courses in statistics, 8 credits, Graduate School, University of Florida, 1993-1994

      CPR and Firs Aide (current certifications held from 1989 to 1997; 2009

      DAN Emergency Oxygen Administration 1994 & 1996

      NAUI Dry Suite Training 1994

      Supervisor I Training 1996

      Personnel Training for Supervisors 1997

      DOI Boating Safety 1997

      USGS Lotus Notes software training 1999

      AIMS Training (December 2000)

     Federal Information Systems Security Awareness Training 2003 to 2011

      Charge Card Holder Travel and Purchase Training 2004

      DOI Safety Training 2005

      Discrimination and Whistle-blowing in the Workplace 2007 to 2011

      Privacy Act Orientation 2008 to 2011

      Records Management Awareness 2006 to 2011

      DOI Safe Driver Training 2011

 

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

 

PRESENT ASSIGNMENTS

 

Fisheries Research Biologist, Southeast Ecological Science Center

Dates:  from 2010 to present (2005 to 2010, ex Florida Integrated Science Center)

 

PREVIOUS PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS

 

1        Research Fishery Biologist, GS-482-12, Florida Integrated Science Center, Gainesville, FL

            DATES: From 01/1995 to 12/2005

 

            Responsible for a program of basic and applied investigations of biological phenomena associated with the imperilment of freshwater fishes in the southeastern United States.  Investigations focused on changes in the composition and distribution of the imperiled fauna, patterns and processes of decline, and experimental assessment of a major stressor (excessive sedimentation).  Primary research area involving field work became the southern terminus of Appalachian Mountains in north Alabama and Georgia, and southeastern Tennessee.

 

SUPERVISOR NAME AND TITLE

Nicholas A. Funicelli, Chief, Coastal and Marine Ecology Section, Florida Caribbean Science Center

 

            2    Research Fisheries Biologist, GS 482-11, (ex National Fisheries Research Center, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; ex National Biological Survey; ex National Biological Service)

DATES: From 07/1990 to12/1994

 

Responsible for implementing a basic and applied research program on southeastern freshwater fishes from terminus of Southern Appalachia to Florida panhandle.  Emphasis was on field survey to determine distribution and relative abundance of imperiled and endangered fishes; determined the distribution and co-described a new dater species from the Etowah River system, north Georgia.  The principal DOI client agency was the Jacksonville and Panama City field offices, FWS, and Eglin Air Force Base (DOD).

 

SUPERVISOR NAME AND TITLE

James D. Williams, Chief, Aquatic Ecology Branch

 

3    Research Fisheries Biologist, GS 482-9 (term position converted to full time), National Fisheries Research Center, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

DATES: From 06/1988 to 08/1990

 

The scientists investigated the rudd, Scardinius erythropthalmus, an exotic minnow new to the aquaculture trade in the late 1980s, to determine if it could cause ecological harm if released into the wild.  It was experimentally determined that rudd would readily hybridize with native golden shiners in the laboratory.  The scientist was subsequently tasked to determine current research needs of the endangered Okaloosa darter Etheostoma okaloosae, and began surveys of the Etowah River, Georgia, to determine the distributional limits and status of an rare undescribed species, the ‘Cherokee darter’ Etheostoma (Ulocentra) sp.  Three summers of field survey delimited the range of the Cherokee darter and provided considerable new material needed for its description.

 

SUPERVISOR NAME AND TITLE

James D. Williams, Leader, Exotic Fishes Program

 

            4    Private Contractor, Fly Fishing Guide, Salem, Virginia

DATES: From 03/1987 to 05/1988

 

Funding for the Virginia fishes book project ended in February 1987; worked intermittently as a private contractor sorting and identifying freshwater fish collections, Fly Fishing Guide for Orvis of Roanoke (former IGFA World Record for smallmouth bass (tippet class record, from 1983 to 1992).

 

SUPERVISOR NAME AND TITLE

Self (independent contractor)

 

5    Research Associate, Department of Biology, Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia 24153

DATES: From 09/1979 to 02/1987

 

Coauthored the freshwater fishes of Virginia book with Robert E. Jenkins; publication #20).  The project required considerable original study of Virginia fishes, including three summers of field survey; compilation of species collection records from the literature, museums, other sources; developed field techniques to photograph color images; photographed B&W images for species accounts; compiled and organized literature for writing species accounts; prepared maps and other illustrations; studied diagnostic characters and wrote dichotomous keys for all families treated except the  Petromyzontidae, Catostomidae, and Cottidae; wrote species accounts for primitive families (except sturgeons and clupeids), and species accounts for the Cyprinidae, Ictaluridae, Esocidae, Salmonidae, Aphredoderidae, Amblyopsidae, Gasterosteidae, Atherinopsidae, Fundulidae, Poeciliidae, Moronidae, and the Centrarchidae.  It took two years for us to write the 2200-page submission draft of the manuscript.

 

SUPERVISOR NAME AND TITLE

Robert E. Jenkins, Professor, Department of Biology, Roanoke College, Salem, VA 24153

 

6    Research Associate, Department of Biology, Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia 24153

Dates: From 04/1981to 06/1983

 

During a two-year hiatus in funding for the VA fish book project, I sought and obtained funding from the U.S. Army Corp Engineers to conduct ecological and distributional surveys of two Candidate species, the orangefin madtom Noturus gilberti and the Roanoke logperch Percina rex, in the Roanoke River drainage.  The study determined that both species had limited ranges, that contiguously occupied streams were comparatively small, that streams varied considerably in quality due to human activities, that both species had lost significant portions of putative former range, and that population sizes were relatively small.  Upon completion of the report, I petitioned the FWS to list both species as endangered.  After review, the Roanoke logperch was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.

 

SUPERVISOR NAME AND TITLE

Robert E. Jenkins, Professor, Department of Biology, Roanoke College, Salem, VA 24153

 

7    Graduate Student, Zoology Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

DATES: From 09/1976 to 08/1979

 

Earned MS in Zoology; received training in ichthyology and aquatic biology; was privileged to be at UT during peak era of Etnier’s students (up to 17 MS and PhD students studying systematics, zoogeography, life history, and ecology of fishes, crayfishes, and aquatic insects).  Thesis title: “Life history of the stoneroller Campostoma anomalum in upper East Tennessee.”

 

MAJOR PROFESSOR AND TITLE

David A. Etnier, Professor, Department of Zoology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville 37916 

 

8    Biologist, Ichthyological Associates, Wilmington, Delaware

DATES: From 06/1974 to 08/1976

 

Responsible for ichthyoplankton collection and sorting entrained by a coal-fired power plant in Wilmington, Delaware

 

SUPERVISOR NAME AND TITLE

Dr. Edward C. Raney, President and Owner, Ichthyological Associates, Ithaca, NY.

 

9    Biological Technician, Department of Biology, Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia

DATES: From 06/1973 to 05/1974

 

Drafted stream map of Virginia; visited museums and recorded records of fishes from Virginia; plotted several thousand locality records of fish collections; summarized other data relevant to a future book on Virginia freshwater fishes.

 

SUPERVISOR NAME AND TITLE

Robert E. Jenkins, Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, Roanoke College, Salem, VA 24153

 

10  Field Crew Leader, National Forest Stream Survey, Department of Biology, Roanoke College, Salem, VA 24153

DATES: From 06/1972 to 08/1972

 

Led a four-person field crew surveying streams of the Washington and Jefferson National Forests, southwestern Virginia; responsible for daily itinerary and site selection; processed and stored specimens. Rediscovered the supposedly extinct sharphead dater, Etheostoma acuticeps, in the South Fork of the Holston River, Virginia, and significantly expanded the range of the roughead shiner Notropis semperasper, a James River endemic.

 

SUPERVISOR NAME AND TITLE

Robert E. Jenkins, Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, Roanoke College, Salem, VA 24153

 

11  Field Crew Leader, Delmarva Mammal Survey, Mammal Division, U.S. National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC, 20013

DATES: From 06/1971 to 08/1971

Supervised collection of mammals with firearms, snap, box, and pit traps, and mist nets; led morning and evening hunts; changed trap lines as needed; planned daily itineraries; we prepared nearly 1000 museum skins during the summer.

 

SUPERVISOR NAME AND TITLE

Richard W. Thorington, Jr., Curator, Division of Mammals, U.S. National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC 20013

 

12  Museum Aide, Mammal Division, U.S. National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC 20013

DATES: From 06/1970-08/1970

Tasked to curate the Vespertilionidae (largest bat family in North America); checked specimens against catalog; matched skins and skulls; prepared new labels as directed; worked in dermestid beetle colony.

 

SUPERVISOR NAME AND TITLE

Clyde Jones, Curator, Mammal Division, U.S. National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC, 20013

 

CURRENT MEMBERSHIPS IN PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES

 

American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, 1975 to present

      Served on the Conservation Committee, 1991 to 1998; 2000 to present

Southeastern Fishes Council, 1978 to present

           Served as Southeast (Region II) Representative from 1989 to 2002

           Current Chair (2006 to 2007)

           Immediate Past Chair (2008 to 2009)

           State Reporter, Florida (began in 2009)

Society for Conservation Biology, 1993 to 2002.

American Fisheries Society, 2002 to present

           Outside member, Endangered Species Committee (ESC) 2001-2002

           Chair, ESC, 2004 to 2011

 




 PUBLICATIONS

Jenkins, R. E., and N. M. Burkhead. 1975. Recent capture and analysis of sharphead darter, Etheostoma acuticeps, an endangered percid fish of the upper Tennessee River drainage.  Copeia 1975:731-740.

Jenkins, R. E., and N. M. Burkhead. 1975. Distribution and aspects of life history and morphology of the cyprinid fish Notropis semperasper endemic to the upper James River drainage, Virginia.  Chesapeake Science 16:178-191.

Jenkins, R. E., N. M. Burkhead, and D. J. Jenkins. 1976.  An ichthyologist looks at Virginia.  Virginia Wildlife 37(7):20-22.

Jenkins, R. E., N. M. Burkhead, and D. A. Etnier. 1980.  Hybopsis cahni Hubbs and Crowe, Slender Chub.  Page 182  In:  Atlas of North American Freshwater Fishes.  North Carolina State Museum Natural History, Raleigh.

Jenkins, R. E., and N. M. Burkhead. 1980. Hybopsis monacha (Cope), spotfin chub. Page 192 In: Atlas of North American Freshwater Fishes.  North Carolina State Museum Natural History, Raleigh.

Burkhead, N. M. 1980. The life history of the stoneroller minnow Campostoma a. anomalum (Rafinesque) in five streams in east Tennessee. Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency Technical Report No. 80-50, Nashville.

Burkhead, N. M., R. E. Jenkins, and E. G. Maurakis. 1980. New records, distribution and diagnostic characters of Virginia ictalurid catfishes with an adnexed adipose fin. Brimleyana 4:75-93.

Burkhead, N. M., and B. H. Bauer. 1983. An intergeneric cyprinid hybrid, Hybopsis monacha X Notropis galacturus, from the Tennessee River drainage. Copeia 1983:1074-1077.

Jenkins, R. E., and N. M. Burkhead. 1984. Description, biology and distribution of the spotfin chub, Hybopsis monacha, a threatened cyprinid fish of the Tennessee River drainage. Bulletin Alabama Museum Natural History 8:1-30.

Burkhead, N. M., and J. D. Williams. 1990. Research on the Okaloosa darter focuses on competition and habitat use. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin 25(11):5-6.

Burkhead, N. M. 1991. Southeast regional report. Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council 23:18.

Burkhead, N. M., and J. D. Williams. 1991. An intergeneric hybrid of a native minnow, the golden shiner, and an exotic minnow, the rudd.  Transactions American Fisheries Society 120:781-795.

Burkhead, N. M., and R. E. Jenkins. 1991. Fishes. Pages 321-409, in K. Terwilliger (coordinator).  Virginia's Endangered Species. McDonald and Woodward Publishing Company, Blacksburg, Virginia.

Burkhead, N. M. 1991. Region II report, southeast. Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council 25:5-6.

Burkhead, N. M., J. D. Williams. 1992. The boulder darter: a conservation challenge. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin 27(3-8):4-6.

Burkhead, N. M., J. D. Williams, and B. J. Freeman. 1992. A river under siege. Georgia Wildlife 2(2):10-17.

Burkhead, N. M., J. D. Williams, and R. W. Yeager. 1992. Okaloosa darter.  Etheostoma okaloosae. Pages 23-30, in C. R. Gilbert (editor).  Rare and endangered biota of Florida. Volume II.  Fishes.  University Press of Florida, Gainesville.

Burkhead, N. M. 1993. Region II report, Southeast. Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council 27:10-11.

Easton, R.S., D.J. Orth, and N.M. Burkhead. 1993. The first collection of the rudd, Scardinius erythropthalmus (Cyprinidae), in the New River, West Virginia. J. Freshwater Ecology 8(3): 263-264.

Burkhead, N. M. 1994. Region II report, Southeast. Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council 30:13-14.

Jenkins, R. E., and N. M. Burkhead. 1994. The Freshwater Fishes of Virginia. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, MD.

Burkhead, N. M. 1995. Region II report, Southeast. Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council 32:14-15.

Bauer, B. H., D. A. Etnier, and N. M. Burkhead. 1995. Etheostoma (Ulocentra) scotti (OSTEICHTHYS: PERCIDAE), a new darter from the Etowah River system in Georgia. Bulletin Alabama Museum of Natural History 17: 1-16.

Walsh, S. J., N. M. Burkhead, and J. D. Williams. 1995. Southeastern freshwater fishes.  Pages 144-147, in E. T. LaRoe, G. S. Farris, C. E. Puckett, P. D. Morgan, and M. J. Mac (editors).  Our living resources.  A report to the nation on the distribution, abundance, and health of U. S. plants, animals, and ecosystems.  U. S. Department of the Interior, National Biological Service, Washington, D.C.

Burkhead, N. M. 1996. Region II report, Southeast.  Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council 33:12-13.

Burkhead, N. M. 1997. The Fishes of West Virginia by Jay R. Stauffer, Jr., Jeffery M. Boltz, and Laura R. White. Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 1995. Review, Fisheries 22(4):54-56.

Burkhead, N. M., S. J. Walsh, B. J. Freeman, and J. D. Williams. 1997. Status and restoration of the Etowah River, an imperiled southern Appalachian river ecosystem. Pages 375-444, in G. A. Benz and D. E. Collins (editors).  Aquatic fauna in peril: the southeastern perspective.  Special Publication No. 1, Southeast Aquatic Research Institute, Lenz Design & Communications, Decatur, GA.

Burkhead, N. M. 1999. Region II report, southeast. Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council 38:11-12.

Burkhead, N. M. 2000.  Region II report, southeast.  roceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council 41:13-16.

Burkhead, N. M. and H. L. Jelks. 2000. Essay 1. Diversity, levels of imperilment, and cryptic fishes in the southeastern United States. Pages 30 - 32, in Abell, R.A., D.M. Olson, E. Dinerstein, P.T. Hurley, J.T. Diggs, W. Eichbaum, S. Walters, W. Wettengel, T. Allnutt, C.J. Loucks, and P. Hedao. Freshwater ecoregions of North America: a conservation assessment. Island Press, Covelo, CA.

Burkhead, N. M. 2001. Region II report, southeast. Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council 42:16-18.

Burkhead, N. M., and H. L. Jelks. 2001. The effects of suspended sediment on the reproductive success of the tricolor shiner, a crevice-spawning minnow. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 130(5):959-968.

Burkhead, N.M. (Reviewer). 2002. Freshwater Fish Distribution by T.M. Berra. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 21(4): 729-731.

Burkhead, N. M., and D. H. Huge. 2002.  The case of the red shiner: what happens when a good fish goes bad?  (web address copied on 28 July 2005). http://cars.er.usgs.gov/Southeastern_Aquatic_Fauna/Freshwater_Fishes/Shiner_Research/shiner_research.html

Burkhead, N. M. 2004. Logperches: masters of stone. American Currents Fall (2004):18-21.

Freeman, M. C., E. R. Irwin, N. M. Burkhead, B. J. Freeman, and H. L. Bart, Jr. 2005. Status and conservation of the fish fauna of the Alabama River system. American Fisheries Society Symposium 45:557–585.

Williams, J. DD. A. Neely, S. J. Walsh, and N. M. Burkhead. 2007. Three new percid fishes (Percidae: Percina) from the Mobile Basin drainage of Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee.  Zootaxa 1549:1-28.

Walters, D.M., Blum, M.J., Rashleigh, B., Freeman, B.J., Porter, B.A., and N.M. Burkhead. 2008. Red shiner invasion and hybridization with blacktail shiner in the upper Coosa River, USA. Biological Invasions 10(8): 1229-1242.

Freeman, M.C., B. J. Freeman, N.M. Burkhead, and C.A. Straight. 2008. A new species of Percina (Perciformes: Percidae) from the Apalachicola River drainage, southeastern United States. Zootaxa1963: 25–42.

Jelks, H.L., S.J. Walsh, N. M. Burkhead, S. Contreras-Balderas, E. Díaz-Pardo, D.A. Hendrickson, J. Lyons, N.E. Mandrak, F. McCormick, J.S. Nelson, S.P. Platania, B.A. Porter, C.B. Renaud, J.J. Schmitter-Soto, E.B. Taylor, and M.L. Warren, Jr. 2008. Conservation status of imperiled North American freshwater and diadromous Fishes. Fisheries 33 (5):372-407.

Jelks, H.L., S.J. Walsh, N. M. Burkhead, S. Contreras-Balderas, E. Díaz-Pardo, D.A. Hendrickson, J. Lyons, N.E. Mandrak, F. McCormick, J.S. Nelson, S.P. Platania, B.A. Porter, C.B. Renaud, J.J. Schmitter-Soto, E.B. Taylor, and M.L. Warren, Jr. 2008. Conservation status of imperiled North American freshwater and diadromous Fishes. (website)  http://fl.biology.usgs.gov/afs/

Walsh, S.J., H.L. Jelks, and N.M. Burkhead. 2009. The decline of North American freshwater fishes.  http://www.actionbioscience.org/biodiversity/walsh.html

Burkhead, N.M. (Reviewer) 2009. Fish conservation: a guide to understanding and restoring global aquatic biodiversity and fishery resources. Gene S. Helfman. Island Press, Washington, D.C. 2007. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 138:1198–1205.

Burkhead, N.M. 2009. The Southeastern Fishes Council List of Freshwater Fishes.  http://ichthyology.usm.edu/sfc/fishes/ (October 2009).

Burkhead, N.M. 2009. Research and conservation activities in Florida 2009. Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council No. 51:41-43.

Blum, M. J., D. M. Walters, N. M. Burkhead, B. J. Freeman, B. A. Porter. 2010. Reproductive isolation and the expansion of an invasive hybrid swarm. Biological Invasions http://www.springerlink.com/content/h663231513843388/fulltext.pdf

Burkhead, N.M. 2010. Research and conservation activities in Florida 2010. Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council (December), No. 52:22-23.

Burkhead, N.M., T. Hoehn, and W. Tate. 2011. Bluenose shiner biological status review report. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Tallahassee, Florida.

Burkhead, N.M., T. Hoehn, and W. Tate. 2011. Blackmouth shiner biological status review report. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Tallahassee, Florida.

Burkhead, N.M. 2011. Research and conservation activities in Florida 2011. Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council (December), No. 53:22-24.

Ward LW, Blum MJ, Walters DM, Porter BA, Burkhead N, Freeman B. 2012. Discordant introgression in a rapidly expanding hybrid swarm. Evolutionary Applications 2012: 380-392. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-4571.2012.00249.x/pdf

Burkhead NM. 2012. Research and conservation activities in Florida 2012. Proceedings of the Southeastern Fishes Council (December), No. 54:21-22.

Burkhead NM. 2012. Extinction rates in North American freshwater fishes, 1900 to 2010. BioScience 62: 798-808.

Burkhead NM. 2012. Extinction rates in North American freshwater fishes. http://fl.biology.usgs.gov/extinct_fishes/index.html

Johnson PD, Bogan AE, Brown KM, Burkhead NM, Cordeiro JR, Garner JT, Hartfield PD, Lepizki DAW, Mackie GR, Pip E, Tarpley TA, Tiemann JR, Whelan NV, Strong EE. In press. Conservation status of freshwater gastropods of Canada and the United States. Fisheries 38: __-__.




                           

My Science Topics


Science Topic
Subtopic
Ecology and Environmentbiodiversity
Ecology and Environmentbiogeography
Ecology and Environmentbenthic ecosystems
Ecology and Environmentaquatic ecosystems
Ecology and Environmentfreshwater ecosystems
Ecology and Environmentenvironmental assessment
Environmental Issueshuman impacts
Environmental Issuesland use change
Plants and Animalsanimals
Plants and Animalsendangered species
Plants and Animalsextinction and extirpation
Plants and Animalsinvasive species
Plants and Animalsspecies diversity
Plants and Animalsvertebrates



My USGS Science Strategy Areas

Climate Variability & Change

The Role of Environment and Wildlife in Human Health

Understanding Ecosystems & Predicting Ecosystems Change

Relying on phylogenetic systematics and evolutionary theory for underpinnings of investigations, Noel Burkhead conducts basic research in the areas of biology, behavior, conservation, and ecology of freshwater fishes. Most research is linked to some aspect of conservation of ichthyodiversity. Noel has co-described three species of darters (two Percina and one Etheostoma) from the southeast uplands. While the majority of his field experience is in the southeastern United States and Gulf drainages in Mexico, he is interested in topical research problems and interesting fishes wherever they occur (a fish is a fish…). His current activities focus on contemporary extinction rates and underlying patterns of extinction of North American freshwater and diadromous fishes. This work has been expanded to include freshwater macroinvertebrates: mussels, snails, and crayfish extinction rates in North America (North American mollusks have the highest modern to background extinction rates of any group in the world). He is currently working on the descriptions of four putative new species of darters allied to the holiday darter Etheostoma brevirostrum. Recent research efforts have focused on interactions between nonindigenous populations of the red shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis) and its interactions, primarily hybrid swarms, with other species of Cyprinella, the second largest cyprinid genus in North America. Noel is interested in life history of fishes, particularly in life history patterns among related groups of fishes. Studies of the enigmatic Slender Chub (Erimystax cahni), a Clinch River endemic, are planned that will hopefully determine if that species is likely extinct. This minnow has only been observed once (in 1996) despite repeated efforts by knowledgeable biologists. Noel plans to continue investigations of extinction-prone fishes by comparing life histories of extinct taxa to extant North American freshwater fishes. He hopes to help establish long term monitoring sites in the upper Suwannee River basin relative to ground water withdrawals and stability of base flows relative to imperiled mussels. The important question is whether current groundwater withdrawals will affect the persistence of mussel populations in small headwater streams.


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Contact Information

Noel Burkhead
7920 NW 71st Street
Gainesville, FL 32653
nburkhead@usgs.gov
352-264-3499
352-378-4956 - Fax
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