USGS - science for a changing world

USGS Professional Pages

Blank space
Search USGS Professionals Featured Profiles Blank space Frequently Asked Questions  |  About The USGS Professional Pages
bio image of Noel  Pavlovic

Noel Pavlovic

ECOLOGIST

Contact Info


Short Biography

 

Dr. Noel B. Pavlovic is a research ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, stationed at the Lake Michigan Ecological Research Station in Porter, Indiana, where he has worked for 30 years.  He received his PhD in biological sciences from the University of Illinois at Chicago, MSc. in ecology from the University of Tennessee, and BS in biology from Earlham College.  His dissertation focused on the biology and demography of fame flower (Phemeranthus rugospermum), a Midwestern endemic succulent plant. He has studied fire effects on the structure, phenology, and floral and faunal composition of Midwest oak savannas.  His research on oriental bittersweet focuses on two areas; 1) the potential for hybridization between the invasive Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) and the native American bittersweet (C. scandens) and 2) fire effects on the invasion and spread of Oriental bittersweet.  He has also conducted surveys on the distribution and abundance to exotic plants in three Great Lakes National Parks.





Download CV

Publications

Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Pavlovic, Noel B.; Adams, Jean V., 2012. Competitive Interactions of Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) and Damesrocket (Hesperis matronalis). Weed Science Society of America , 10 p.

Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Pavlovic, Noel B., 2012. Encroachment of oriental bittersweet into Pitcher’s thistle habitat. Natural Areas Association , 6 p.

Buszka, Paul M.; Cohen, David A.; Lampe, David C.; Pavlovic, Noel B., 2011. Relation of hydrologic processes to groundwater and surface-water levels and flow directions in a dune-beach complex at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore and Beverly Shores, Indiana. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2011-5073, ix, 75 p. [Link]

Pavlovic, N. B.; Leicht-Young, S. A. , 2011. Are temperate mature forests buffered from invasive lianas?. ,

Pavlovic, N. B.; Leicht-Young, S. A.; Grundel, R. , 2011. Short-term effects of burn season on flowering phenology of savanna plants. ,

Grundel, R.; Jean, R. P.; Frohnapple, K. J.; Gibbs, J.; Glowacki, G. A.; Pavlovic, N. B. , 2011. A survey of bees (hymenoptera: Apoidea) of the Indiana dunes and Northwest Indiana, USA. ,

Grundel, R.; Frohnapple, K. J.; Jean, R. P.; Pavlovic, N. B. , 2011. Effectiveness of bowl trapping and netting for inventory of a bee community. ,

Pavlovic et al, 1998. Pitcher's thistle (Cirsium pitcheri) recovery plan. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service , 79 p.

McEachern, K.; Bowles, M.; Pavlovic, N.Bowles, M.; Whelen, C., 1994. A metapopulation approach to Pitcher's thistle (Cirsium pitcheri) recovery in southern Lake Michigan dunes. Cambridge University Press , p. 194-218

McEachern, K.; Magnuson, J.; Pavlovic, N., 1989. Preliminary results of a study to monitor Cirsium pitcheri in Great Lakes National Lakeshores. Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore Technical Report, Porter, Indiana. ,

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]

1 [Link]






                           

My Science Topics


Science Topic
Subtopic
Ecology and Environmentbiodiversity
Ecology and Environmentforests
Ecology and Environmentgrasslands
Ecology and Environmenthabitats
Plants and Animalsendangered species
Plants and Animalsflowering plants
Plants and Animalsinvasive species
Plants and Animalsplants
Plants and Animalsvegetation
Plants and Animalswildlife



My USGS Science Strategy Areas

Understanding Ecosystems & Predicting Ecosystems Change

Climate Variability & Change

Invasive plant species across landscapes

I have been studying the impact of invasive species across biological organization and  scales from genes, individuals, patches, habitats, to landscapes..  Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), a highly invasvie liana from east Asia, has been the focal species.  Oriental bittersweet has migrated westward form the northeast to cover the eastern half of the continental U.S.  My colleagues and I have been studying this species across the lanscape at different scales to unterstand the potential threat of this species and its ecolocigal impact.  We first examined the utility of morphological characters to distinguish this species from its native congener, American bitttersweet (C. scandens).  Next we have developed the genetic tools to examine the potential for hybridization between the two species.  This work has shown that oriental bittersweet is hybridizing American bittersweet to extinction through pollen swamping and asymmetric fertilization.  Since F2 hybrids are sterile, hybrid swardms are not expected.  Additional reserarch has documented that  nurseries are inadvertentaly selling oriental bittersweet as American bittersweet.   Papers will be forthcoming in 2013-2014 by David Zaya concerning the potential for hybridization.  We have looked at the potential for invasion of oriental bittersweet in the context of wild and prescribed burning.  Oriental bittersweet is known to root sucker, so we have examined how fire and cutting influences this response.  We have looks at how high temperature incluence seed viability, how litter removal and burning incluences bittersweet invasion across a habitat and soil gradient, how bittersweet growth and root reserves (total nonstructural carbohydrates) respond to fire and cutting, and how fire and disurbance across the landscape influences bitttersweet distirbution and abundance.  We have also examined the distribution and abundance of lianas, including oriental bittersweet from early successional forest to mature and old growth forests.  From these studies we have deriveed an comprehensive perspective on the impacts and invasion of oriental bittersweet in North America.  We have demonstrated that cutting of oriental bitttersweet in early July, subsequently reduces TNC by 75% from formant season leavels and provides a strategy and hope for controlling this  highly invasive ecological engineer.


Contact Information

Noel Pavlovic
1100 North Mineral Springs Road
Porter, IN 46304
npavlovic@usgs.gov
219-926-8336 x428
216-926-5792 - Fax
Back to top

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://profile.usgs.gov/professional/mypage.php
Page Contact Information:Ask USGS
Page Last Modified: January 24 2013 17:21:51.
Version: 2.6